“Ursa Minor”: Sara Grace Wallerstedt by Paolo Roversi In Dazed Autumn 2018

by on Aug.14, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

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Featuring looks from looks from Comme des Garçons’ fall-winter runway collection, model Sara Grace Wallerstedt’s celestial visage is captured by photographer, Paolo Roversi for Dazed Magazine Autumn 2018 www. dazeddigital .com

Ursa Minor Dazed Autumn 2018
Photography:  Paolo Roversi
Model:  Sara Grace Wallerstedt
Styling:  Robbie Spencer
Make-Up & Hair:  Julien D’Ys
Manicure:  Typhaine Kersual
Set Design:  Jean-Hugues de Chatillon

 

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“Ursa Minor”: Sara Grace Wallerstedt by Paolo Roversi In Dazed Autumn 2018

by on Aug.14, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Featuring looks from looks from Comme des Garçons’ fall-winter runway collection, model Sara Grace Wallerstedt’s celestial visage is captured by photographer, Paolo Roversi for Dazed Magazine Autumn 2018 www. dazeddigital .com

Ursa Minor Dazed Autumn 2018
Photography:  Paolo Roversi
Model:  Sara Grace Wallerstedt
Styling:  Robbie Spencer
Make-Up & Hair:  Julien D’Ys
Manicure:  Typhaine Kersual
Set Design:  Jean-Hugues de Chatillon

 

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BloodMilk OOAK Live Sale + Moth

by on Aug.09, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

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For the first time, BloodMilk Jewels will be presenting a live sale via their Instagram Stories of a number of one of a kind jewels. In an effort to create a worldwide inclusion for the BloodMilk collectors, this sale will a streamed event with one of a kind and limited items that have been only previously available at destination trunk shows.

BloodMilk will be streaming this event at 3PM EST on Friday, August 10: Follow the BloodMilk Instagram to view

To purchase the OOAK pieces, you will have the option to “swipe up” on Instagram stories to be lead to a link to purchase after Jess and Jenny introduce and detail each item. This will obviously be a first come, first serve basis, as each piece is limited, so please mark your calendars for this event, and also please be conscious and accepting that this is an experimental event, with the aim to give the opportunity to those unable to attend the trunk shows access to special pieces. The BloodMilk team is making every effort available to grant accessibility to as many people as possible via the live stream.

Tandem to this event, there will also be a flock of planchette moths released into the permanent collection, with incarnations of rings, necklaces, and brooches.

I have a personal, special attachment to this series, as it was originally birthed as a tattoo design over a Thanksgiving dinner at my home in New Orleans a few years back: Jess and I wanted to have matching tattoos, and overnight Aaron drew the original Planchette Moth and the following day, Jordan tattooed it on us. I am very excited for this series to make its way into the wild, and brings each of you the feelings of family and joy that I have been fortunate enough to experience through them.

The current Moth collection will find a new home within the retired archives of the BloodMilk line on September 7, so please be aware these are the final weeks to add these to your treasure chest.


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BloodMilk OOAK Live Sale + Moth

by on Aug.09, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

For the first time, BloodMilk Jewels will be presenting a live sale via their Instagram Stories of a number of one of a kind jewels. In an effort to create a worldwide inclusion for the BloodMilk collectors, this sale will a streamed event with one of a kind and limited items that have been only previously available at destination trunk shows.

BloodMilk will be streaming this event at 3PM EST on Friday, August 10: Follow the BloodMilk Instagram to view

To purchase the OOAK pieces, you will have the option to “swipe up” on Instagram stories to be lead to a link to purchase after Jess and Jenny introduce and detail each item. This will obviously be a first come, first serve basis, as each piece is limited, so please mark your calendars for this event, and also please be conscious and accepting that this is an experimental event, with the aim to give the opportunity to those unable to attend the trunk shows access to special pieces. The BloodMilk team is making every effort available to grant accessibility to as many people as possible via the live stream.

Tandem to this event, there will also be a flock of planchette moths released into the permanent collection, with incarnations of rings, necklaces, and brooches.

I have a personal, special attachment to this series, as it was originally birthed as a tattoo design over a Thanksgiving dinner at my home in New Orleans a few years back: Jess and I wanted to have matching tattoos, and overnight Aaron drew the original Planchette Moth and the following day, Jordan tattooed it on us. I am very excited for this series to make its way into the wild, and brings each of you the feelings of family and joy that I have been fortunate enough to experience through them.

The current Moth collection will find a new home within the retired archives of the BloodMilk line on September 7, so please be aware these are the final weeks to add these to your treasure chest.


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Haute Macabre Shop Update: Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Summer Pre-Sales Are Open on

by on Aug.04, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The Haute Macabre Shop is now accepting pre-orders for our beloved Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Collection, including all of the Hair Glosses by their sister company, Black Phoenix Trading Post.

In addition to our current pre-orders, we have introduced two new items to our shop: the Sabbat unisex shirt and Sabbat Limited Edition Poster, designed by Jordan Barlow. Each poster measures 18″ x 24″, screen printed with care by Monolith Press. Please note that the poster must ship separately from the rest of your order due to its size.

Pre-orders will be open from today through 11:59PM CST on Monday, August 20 with an estimated ship time of mid-September.


Haute Macabre
Oak leaf, bourbon vanilla, almond husk, and black leather accord darkened by a 13-year aged black patchouli.
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

So Below
Amber and black copal with black coconut, Sumatran red patchouli, green cardamom pod, and golden musk.
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

As Above
Leather drenched with white patchouli, oak bark, bourbon vanilla, bitter almond, and Moroccan jasmine.


Esbat
The silent rays of the full moon piercing the shadows of an ancient grove: a ragged canopy of moonflower and morning glory, dew-touched mosses creeping over gnarled oak roots, and shimmering beams of mugwort, cuckoo flower, and rose mallow.

Mummies of Mexico City
Contains notes of church incense, ornate gold, old lace, and dust. A sacred, secret scent, recalling residual whispers of incense settling into the ancient, forgotten dust.
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

Burying Point
Damp clusters of brown patchouli, dried maple leaves, black sage, spikenard, and curled, misshapen mandrake roots
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

Laurel Hill
Mountain laurel petals limned in pale pink settling among boughs of hemlock, soft mosses, and dark lichens.

St Louis
Drooping Spanish moss and crumbling marble, sweet olive blossom, 13-year aged black patchouli, and offerings of Bay Rum, Florida water, and tobacco (Burying Point available separately)


Pre-orders will be open from today through 11:59PM CST on Monday, August 20 with an estimated ship time of mid-September.
Please click here to visit the Haute Macabre Shop


 

Leave a Comment more...

Haute Macabre Shop Update: Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Summer Pre-Sales Are Open on

by on Aug.04, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The Haute Macabre Shop is now accepting pre-orders for our beloved Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Collection, including all of the Hair Glosses by their sister company, Black Phoenix Trading Post.

In addition to our current pre-orders, we have introduced two new items to our shop: the Sabbat unisex shirt and Sabbat Limited Edition Poster, designed by Jordan Barlow. Each poster measures 18″ x 24″, screen printed with care by Monolith Press. Please note that the poster must ship separately from the rest of your order due to its size.

Pre-orders will be open from today through 11:59PM CST on Monday, August 20 with an estimated ship time of mid-September.


Haute Macabre
Oak leaf, bourbon vanilla, almond husk, and black leather accord darkened by a 13-year aged black patchouli.
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

So Below
Amber and black copal with black coconut, Sumatran red patchouli, green cardamom pod, and golden musk.
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

As Above
Leather drenched with white patchouli, oak bark, bourbon vanilla, bitter almond, and Moroccan jasmine.


Esbat
The silent rays of the full moon piercing the shadows of an ancient grove: a ragged canopy of moonflower and morning glory, dew-touched mosses creeping over gnarled oak roots, and shimmering beams of mugwort, cuckoo flower, and rose mallow.

Mummies of Mexico City
Contains notes of church incense, ornate gold, old lace, and dust. A sacred, secret scent, recalling residual whispers of incense settling into the ancient, forgotten dust.
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

Burying Point
Damp clusters of brown patchouli, dried maple leaves, black sage, spikenard, and curled, misshapen mandrake roots
Available as a fragrance oil and a hair gloss

Laurel Hill
Mountain laurel petals limned in pale pink settling among boughs of hemlock, soft mosses, and dark lichens.

St Louis
Drooping Spanish moss and crumbling marble, sweet olive blossom, 13-year aged black patchouli, and offerings of Bay Rum, Florida water, and tobacco (Burying Point available separately)


Pre-orders will be open from today through 11:59PM CST on Monday, August 20 with an estimated ship time of mid-September.
Please click here to visit the Haute Macabre Shop


 

Leave a Comment more...

Stacked July 2018

by on Aug.03, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Sarah

Not That Bad: Dispatches From Rape Culture edited by Roxane Gay — Not That Bad offers a harrowing, haunting gathering of essays from a diverse range of contributors; the title, a reference to the widespread minimization of sexual abuse and rape culture in a world that is shamefully warped. “I taught myself to be grateful I survived even if survival did not look like much,” writes Gay in the introduction, with regard to her gang rape at age 12. I’ve read almost everything Roxane Gay has written, and yet this anthology she has edited, which contains only an introduction with her own writing, seems like the penultimate Roxane Gay book. The violence and trauma she sustained as a girl threads its way into everything she writes, and this volume of essays from women and men who have experienced sexual assaults, seems like the moment that her career has been leading up from the beginning: the collecting and sharing of these stories by those who have endured a similar trauma. This was an inexpressibly painful read–each and every story, whether or not you can relate to the author’s specific experience, or if a particular writer’s voice or writing style appeals to you, or not–is a gut-wrenching expression of grief and betrayal and survival. I can’t say this is a “good” book, in the common parlance of what might constitute such a thing. But I do know that it is a necessary book. And even if Roxane Gay compiled hundreds more stories, thousands, there still wouldn’t be enough books to collect the pain and rage that those of us who have survived these experiences feel, every day of our lives. But this book is a good start.

My Year Of Rest And Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh –It sounds trite, but I haven’t quite been the same after reading My Year Of Rest and Relaxation…and not in a good way. The main character, a thin, pretty, privileged white woman, has decided that life is just too much–she doesn’t want to do anything, feel anything, be anything–and she comes to the conclusion that the best way to deal with things is to medicate herself into a year long nap. With the help of a hilariously awful psychiatrist and a crazy amount of prescription drugs, she more or less manages to do just this. Moshfegh’s characters are terrifically gross and awful (but sometimes in ways that you shamefacedly identify with–if you have ever wiped a booger on a wall or worn crusty underwear for a week, you know what I mean.) They don’t treat themselves well and they don’t treat the people around them very well, either. After finishing this book I found myself feeling lethargic and apathetic and thinking of hibernation with a great deal of yearning. That could be the nasty appeal of this book, or end-of-summer ennui, or maybe a little bit of both.

The People In The Castle: Selected Strange Stories by Joan Aiken –I have been meaning to read this Joan Aiken collection since June of 2016, when I had allotted it, among others, for my summer reading stack. Of course in 2016 I was still catching up on my 2014 reading, so it stands to reason that I’m just now getting around to inhaling this marvelous book of tales. It’s got an intro from Kelly Link, whose brilliant, peculiar writings I love all too well, and if that doesn’t sell you right off the bat, I will tell you that when I read the first story in The People In The Castle, I thought, “ah, so then, this is sort of a cross between Roald Dahl and Leonora Carrington! In further exploration, however, I found that Aiken’s imaginings are not the sometimes frustratingly surreal flights of fancy that Carrington composed, but rather earthier, more practical things. More realistic? No, I would not say that at all, and thank goodness! There are ghost puppies and exotic magics and infernal orchestras galore–but they are experienced by people very much like you and I, living out their lives–people with families, with work situations, people with hopes and dreams and minute, daily dramas. There’s a subtle, but really wonderful humor present in these stories, which prompted the Roald Dahl comparison, but where I think his stories sometimes have awful and unhappy (but kinda funny) things happening to people (and granted, they are sometimes awful and unhappy people) there is a tinge of something sly and dark in his narratives that I don’t find at all in the selections I have read by Aiken. Instead, the tone seems to me one of bright, lively, benevolence, and coupled with that enchanting thread of dream logic which runs throughout these stories, sometimes glinting brightly, sometimes so faint that it’s but a winking phantom gleam–it is likely these are gentle, magical romps that you could read to children.  Except, in several of these vignettes, I will admit, I felt that there was something going on that I didn’t quite understand…something, of some importance, that lay just beyond my grasp. That, too, is part of their charm, and who better than a child to perceive this and yet still be totally okay with it? Sometimes not everything makes sense. And most times, that’s where the magic lies.

Dead Girls: Essays On Surviving An American Obsession by Alice Bolin –This book was much more, and much less than I thought it was going to be. Probably because I bought it as soon I saw Carmen Maria Machado (Her Body and Other Parties) tweet about it, and I hadn’t even read the blurbs or description for the book before I Amazon-Primed it. I really thought it was going to be a whole book dissecting and analyzing television shows like True Detective and Twin Peaks ; the dead girl trope and how it is a tableau for predominately men to work out their own issues. And while that was only one chapter in Dead Girls, this book of personal essays tying moments from the author’s own life and experiences into savvy, insightful examinations of books, movies, and songs where women are both troubled and troubling presences was surprisingly more than I bargained for. I could be saying that because in every chapter Bolin references at least four to five books that struck me as “need to reads”; it could be the much-broader-than-expected range of pop cultural criticism it offered; and it very well could be that I am more appreciative than ever when authors write from a place of personal experience, and which Bolin does adeptly, with intelligence, humor, and heart. Also: Ginger Snaps gets a mention, and as we all know, that is the greatest werewolf movie ever made, so I probably would have given this 5 stars for this reason alone.

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn –I read this book in the span of three hours. I don’t think I need to tell you about it. If you’re not reading the book or have already read it, you are probably watching the show. (As am I. I am not enjoying it, but I can’t stop.) I find Gillian Flynn’s work awfully compelling and I hate myself for it. I hate myself for hating myself for it. Flynn writes about complicated women—women who have feelings of anger, aggression, and desire. She addresses this in an interview I read recently, how people suggest that she is not a feminist if she writes about women doing bad things. If she writes about unlikable, villainous women. She pushes back at this notion.  Why are women writers obligated to have all their female characters be virtuous? Why can’t women be villains, too?

Toil & Trouble by Mairghread Scott and illustrated by Kelly Matthews and Nichole Matthews  –After having attended Sleep No More I opined that perhaps I should have made revisiting the story of Macbeth more of a priority before the experience. My friend suggested to me that I should read Toil & Trouble, an exquisitely illustrated re-telling of the tragedy from the witches point of view, instead. We learn of the three weird sisters–Riata, Cait, and Smertae– former mortals who have accepted enormous power and responsibility to protect and defend their Scottish homeland through the ages, and the desperate, diabolical measures they’ll take to ensure this. The notion that the witches are actually the ones working behind the scenes to actively influence the events of the narrative was a perspective that I appreciated the opportunity to have read, and oddly enough, had never given any thought to, until now.

Maika

Despite the fact that I have lists of both things I’ve started writing and things I plan to write, I just can’t with the writing right now. Because reasons, including anxiety at an all-time high. But the reading never stops, thank goodness, at least I can share a list of my recent reads with a sentence or three about each of them.

We Are Never Meeting in Real Life.: Essays by Samantha Irby – I’m late to the cathartic writing of Samantha Irby. While I’d rather have her in my life now than never at all, I desperately wish I’d found her years ago. Unflinchingly (more like daring-you-to-flinch) honest, equal parts heart and gut-wrenching, and – somehow even in moments of profound sadness – breathtakingly funny. It was all I could not not to dive right into her first book, Meaty, because, despite appearances, I swear I really am trying to make some progress in my stacks. In the meantime, however, I’m binging on Irby’s blog, bitches gotta eat and eyeing Meaty as it sits patiently in my Amazon shopping cart. Sigh.

EDIT: I am such a fibber. Since submitting my Stacked contributions to our fearless editor, I have, in fact, gone ahead and ordered a copy of Meaty. I regret nothing. Well, nothing to do with marvelous Samantha Irby, anyway.

Gossamer Days: Spiders, Humans and Their Threads by Eleanor Morgan – Do you love spooders as much as I love spooders? Probably not, but possibly yes! If you’re at all interested in our arachnid friends, the silk they spin, the webs they weave, and what humans have done or simply attempted to do with that singular silken substance over the centuries, I highly recommend this fascinating book.

The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett – I’ve been meaning to read Dashiell Hammett for ages, thinking it would scratch the same combination of literary and thematic itches that the works of Raymond Chandler do so well. Unfortunately this didn’t do the trick, perhaps in part because it turned out to be more murder mystery than hard-boiled crime novel. Dated though they might be, I found the racism and sexism throughout completely distracting and the writing paled in comparison to Chandler’s. Though I was amazed and amused by the constant drinking that Nick and Nora Charles manage to accomplish throughout the story. At one point Nick declines his wife’s offer of breakfast, complaining that it’s too early, and requests a drink instead. It’s no wonder one of my favorite bar tenders in Portland named his dog Asta after the Charles’ pup. I’ve not given up on Hammett just yet. I’m going to read The Maltese Falcon and see if Sam Spade, Hammett’s solitary private eye, and his moody milieu are anything like Chandler’s Philip Marlowe and his hard-boiled environs.

The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell – Easily the creepiest, most unsettling, absolutely riveting haunted-house/ghost story I’ve read since The Haunting of Hill House (which I’m currently rereading). The tale moves back and forth between intertwined Victorian and 17th century doings in the same doomed house, a house where no one is safe. I was impressed by how difficult it was to put this book down and how it never flinched from its mystery and menace, not a single character too precious to emerge unscathed, right up to the nerve-racking end.

The Beauty by Aliya Whiteley – Here’s the thing, call me myco-squeamish, but, by the end of this book, I was so nauseated by the seemingly endless and intensely vivid descriptions of men fucking spongy yellow faceless-fungus-woman-flesh, which is later accompanied by equally graphic and distressing descriptions of a whole new form of birth, that I just wanted it all to be over. Except, I also felt like this story – which had its fascinating moments – ended completely unfinished. So… I sort of regret reading it altogether? I guess? Finishing a book feeling both thoroughly grossed out and unfulfilled is not what I consider a satisfying reading experience.

Descender Vol. 1: Tin Stars and Descender Vol. 2: Machine Moon by Jeff Lemire (Writer) and Dustin Nguyen (Artist) – I’m always reading comics, but more often in single issues form than trade collections so they seldom get a mention here on Stacked. I’m now two books into Descender, a beautifully rendered sci-fi epic about the struggle of a young humanoid robot (and his delightfully boxy, barky robot doggo) to survive in a universe where androids have been outlawed in reaction of a mysterious catastrophic multi-planet event.

Not pictured above because they were read as audio books:

Calypso by David Sedaris : Worth it for any fan of Sedaris’ essays. If anything, I find his essays just grow richer, more poignant, and even funnier as he (and his family) ages. And if you’re not already a fan, this book is still worth it simply for Sedaris’ essay about his wild fox friend. Oh, Carol…

How Not to Be a Boy by Robert Webb – A perfect nexus of my fondness for memoirs in audio book form, British comedy/comedians, and queer coming-of-age stories. Not to mention some wonderfully thoughtful and honest observations about grief.

Featured image: “Birth of a bookworm” by Elizabeth Sagan


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Stacked July 2018

by on Aug.03, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Sarah

Not That Bad: Dispatches From Rape Culture edited by Roxane Gay — Not That Bad offers a harrowing, haunting gathering of essays from a diverse range of contributors; the title, a reference to the widespread minimization of sexual abuse and rape culture in a world that is shamefully warped. “I taught myself to be grateful I survived even if survival did not look like much,” writes Gay in the introduction, with regard to her gang rape at age 12. I’ve read almost everything Roxane Gay has written, and yet this anthology she has edited, which contains only an introduction with her own writing, seems like the penultimate Roxane Gay book. The violence and trauma she sustained as a girl threads its way into everything she writes, and this volume of essays from women and men who have experienced sexual assaults, seems like the moment that her career has been leading up from the beginning: the collecting and sharing of these stories by those who have endured a similar trauma. This was an inexpressibly painful read–each and every story, whether or not you can relate to the author’s specific experience, or if a particular writer’s voice or writing style appeals to you, or not–is a gut-wrenching expression of grief and betrayal and survival. I can’t say this is a “good” book, in the common parlance of what might constitute such a thing. But I do know that it is a necessary book. And even if Roxane Gay compiled hundreds more stories, thousands, there still wouldn’t be enough books to collect the pain and rage that those of us who have survived these experiences feel, every day of our lives. But this book is a good start.

My Year Of Rest And Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh –It sounds trite, but I haven’t quite been the same after reading My Year Of Rest and Relaxation…and not in a good way. The main character, a thin, pretty, privileged white woman, has decided that life is just too much–she doesn’t want to do anything, feel anything, be anything–and she comes to the conclusion that the best way to deal with things is to medicate herself into a year long nap. With the help of a hilariously awful psychiatrist and a crazy amount of prescription drugs, she more or less manages to do just this. Moshfegh’s characters are terrifically gross and awful (but sometimes in ways that you shamefacedly identify with–if you have ever wiped a booger on a wall or worn crusty underwear for a week, you know what I mean.) They don’t treat themselves well and they don’t treat the people around them very well, either. After finishing this book I found myself feeling lethargic and apathetic and thinking of hibernation with a great deal of yearning. That could be the nasty appeal of this book, or end-of-summer ennui, or maybe a little bit of both.

The People In The Castle: Selected Strange Stories by Joan Aiken –I have been meaning to read this Joan Aiken collection since June of 2016, when I had allotted it, among others, for my summer reading stack. Of course in 2016 I was still catching up on my 2014 reading, so it stands to reason that I’m just now getting around to inhaling this marvelous book of tales. It’s got an intro from Kelly Link, whose brilliant, peculiar writings I love all too well, and if that doesn’t sell you right off the bat, I will tell you that when I read the first story in The People In The Castle, I thought, “ah, so then, this is sort of a cross between Roald Dahl and Leonora Carrington! In further exploration, however, I found that Aiken’s imaginings are not the sometimes frustratingly surreal flights of fancy that Carrington composed, but rather earthier, more practical things. More realistic? No, I would not say that at all, and thank goodness! There are ghost puppies and exotic magics and infernal orchestras galore–but they are experienced by people very much like you and I, living out their lives–people with families, with work situations, people with hopes and dreams and minute, daily dramas. There’s a subtle, but really wonderful humor present in these stories, which prompted the Roald Dahl comparison, but where I think his stories sometimes have awful and unhappy (but kinda funny) things happening to people (and granted, they are sometimes awful and unhappy people) there is a tinge of something sly and dark in his narratives that I don’t find at all in the selections I have read by Aiken. Instead, the tone seems to me one of bright, lively, benevolence, and coupled with that enchanting thread of dream logic which runs throughout these stories, sometimes glinting brightly, sometimes so faint that it’s but a winking phantom gleam–it is likely these are gentle, magical romps that you could read to children.  Except, in several of these vignettes, I will admit, I felt that there was something going on that I didn’t quite understand…something, of some importance, that lay just beyond my grasp. That, too, is part of their charm, and who better than a child to perceive this and yet still be totally okay with it? Sometimes not everything makes sense. And most times, that’s where the magic lies.

Dead Girls: Essays On Surviving An American Obsession by Alice Bolin –This book was much more, and much less than I thought it was going to be. Probably because I bought it as soon I saw Carmen Maria Machado (Her Body and Other Parties) tweet about it, and I hadn’t even read the blurbs or description for the book before I Amazon-Primed it. I really thought it was going to be a whole book dissecting and analyzing television shows like True Detective and Twin Peaks ; the dead girl trope and how it is a tableau for predominately men to work out their own issues. And while that was only one chapter in Dead Girls, this book of personal essays tying moments from the author’s own life and experiences into savvy, insightful examinations of books, movies, and songs where women are both troubled and troubling presences was surprisingly more than I bargained for. I could be saying that because in every chapter Bolin references at least four to five books that struck me as “need to reads”; it could be the much-broader-than-expected range of pop cultural criticism it offered; and it very well could be that I am more appreciative than ever when authors write from a place of personal experience, and which Bolin does adeptly, with intelligence, humor, and heart. Also: Ginger Snaps gets a mention, and as we all know, that is the greatest werewolf movie ever made, so I probably would have given this 5 stars for this reason alone.

Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn –I read this book in the span of three hours. I don’t think I need to tell you about it. If you’re not reading the book or have already read it, you are probably watching the show. (As am I. I am not enjoying it, but I can’t stop.) I find Gillian Flynn’s work awfully compelling and I hate myself for it. I hate myself for hating myself for it. Flynn writes about complicated women—women who have feelings of anger, aggression, and desire. She addresses this in an interview I read recently, how people suggest that she is not a feminist if she writes about women doing bad things. If she writes about unlikable, villainous women. She pushes back at this notion.  Why are women writers obligated to have all their female characters be virtuous? Why can’t women be villains, too?

Toil & Trouble by Mairghread Scott and illustrated by Kelly Matthews and Nichole Matthews  –After having attended Sleep No More I opined that perhaps I should have made revisiting the story of Macbeth more of a priority before the experience. My friend suggested to me that I should read Toil & Trouble, an exquisitely illustrated re-telling of the tragedy from the witches point of view, instead. We learn of the three weird sisters–Riata, Cait, and Smertae– former mortals who have accepted enormous power and responsibility to protect and defend their Scottish homeland through the ages, and the desperate, diabolical measures they’ll take to ensure this. The notion that the witches are actually the ones working behind the scenes to actively influence the events of the narrative was a perspective that I appreciated the opportunity to have read, and oddly enough, had never given any thought to, until now.

Maika

Despite the fact that I have lists of both things I’ve started writing and things I plan to write, I just can’t with the writing right now. Because reasons, including anxiety at an all-time high. But the reading never stops, thank goodness, at least I can share a list of my recent reads with a sentence or three about each of them.

We Are Never Meeting in Real Life.: Essays by Samantha Irby – I’m late to the cathartic writing of Samantha Irby. While I’d rather have her in my life now than never at all, I desperately wish I’d found her years ago. Unflinchingly (more like daring-you-to-flinch) honest, equal parts heart and gut-wrenching, and – somehow even in moments of profound sadness – breathtakingly funny. It was all I could not not to dive right into her first book, Meaty, because, despite appearances, I swear I really am trying to make some progress in my stacks. In the meantime, however, I’m binging on Irby’s blog, bitches gotta eat and eyeing Meaty as it sits patiently in my Amazon shopping cart. Sigh.

EDIT: I am such a fibber. Since submitting my Stacked contributions to our fearless editor, I have, in fact, gone ahead and ordered a copy of Meaty. I regret nothing. Well, nothing to do with marvelous Samantha Irby, anyway.

Gossamer Days: Spiders, Humans and Their Threads by Eleanor Morgan – Do you love spooders as much as I love spooders? Probably not, but possibly yes! If you’re at all interested in our arachnid friends, the silk they spin, the webs they weave, and what humans have done or simply attempted to do with that singular silken substance over the centuries, I highly recommend this fascinating book.

The Thin Man by Dashiell Hammett – I’ve been meaning to read Dashiell Hammett for ages, thinking it would scratch the same combination of literary and thematic itches that the works of Raymond Chandler do so well. Unfortunately this didn’t do the trick, perhaps in part because it turned out to be more murder mystery than hard-boiled crime novel. Dated though they might be, I found the racism and sexism throughout completely distracting and the writing paled in comparison to Chandler’s. Though I was amazed and amused by the constant drinking that Nick and Nora Charles manage to accomplish throughout the story. At one point Nick declines his wife’s offer of breakfast, complaining that it’s too early, and requests a drink instead. It’s no wonder one of my favorite bar tenders in Portland named his dog Asta after the Charles’ pup. I’ve not given up on Hammett just yet. I’m going to read The Maltese Falcon and see if Sam Spade, Hammett’s solitary private eye, and his moody milieu are anything like Chandler’s Philip Marlowe and his hard-boiled environs.

The Silent Companions by Laura Purcell – Easily the creepiest, most unsettling, absolutely riveting haunted-house/ghost story I’ve read since The Haunting of Hill House (which I’m currently rereading). The tale moves back and forth between intertwined Victorian and 17th century doings in the same doomed house, a house where no one is safe. I was impressed by how difficult it was to put this book down and how it never flinched from its mystery and menace, not a single character too precious to emerge unscathed, right up to the nerve-racking end.

The Beauty by Aliya Whiteley – Here’s the thing, call me myco-squeamish, but, by the end of this book, I was so nauseated by the seemingly endless and intensely vivid descriptions of men fucking spongy yellow faceless-fungus-woman-flesh, which is later accompanied by equally graphic and distressing descriptions of a whole new form of birth, that I just wanted it all to be over. Except, I also felt like this story – which had its fascinating moments – ended completely unfinished. So… I sort of regret reading it altogether? I guess? Finishing a book feeling both thoroughly grossed out and unfulfilled is not what I consider a satisfying reading experience.

Descender Vol. 1: Tin Stars and Descender Vol. 2: Machine Moon by Jeff Lemire (Writer) and Dustin Nguyen (Artist) – I’m always reading comics, but more often in single issues form than trade collections so they seldom get a mention here on Stacked. I’m now two books into Descender, a beautifully rendered sci-fi epic about the struggle of a young humanoid robot (and his delightfully boxy, barky robot doggo) to survive in a universe where androids have been outlawed in reaction of a mysterious catastrophic multi-planet event.

Not pictured above because they were read as audio books:

Calypso by David Sedaris : Worth it for any fan of Sedaris’ essays. If anything, I find his essays just grow richer, more poignant, and even funnier as he (and his family) ages. And if you’re not already a fan, this book is still worth it simply for Sedaris’ essay about his wild fox friend. Oh, Carol…

How Not to Be a Boy by Robert Webb – A perfect nexus of my fondness for memoirs in audio book form, British comedy/comedians, and queer coming-of-age stories. Not to mention some wonderfully thoughtful and honest observations about grief.

Featured image: “Birth of a bookworm” by Elizabeth Sagan


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Post Mortem July 2018

by on Aug.02, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

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Tarotscopes for the July Eclipse by Sarah Faith Gottesdiener

by on Jul.27, 2018, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Please welcome Sarah Faith Gottesdiener as a new Haute Macabre contributor! Sarah is the author and publisher of the Many Moons Workbook series, professional Tarot reader, artist, and teacher. Learn more about her in an in depth interview with her here on Haute Macabre, and continue reading here for your July Lunar Eclipse Tarotscopes.

Tarotscopes For the July Lunar Eclipse

Following are pulls and interpretations for energies around this July Full Moon Lunar Eclipse. We all have the potential to make shifts and changes that can benefit the collective. We all can check with our energy and listen to what comes through. These are meant to be used for inspiration and support. You may read one, a few, or all, depending on how you are feeling. Take what you like and can use, leave the rest.

Aries: Ace of Pentacles Reversed

Aries, there are new opportunities for you to create magic, to uncover abundance in a garden you’ve already been tending to for some time. Recently, you may have been feeling the urge to go elsewhere. Burn it all down, leave your work, leave that which you have been working towards for so long. Ace of Pentacles reversed suggests that the breakthrough lies in what you already have. Be patient and dig deeper. See things in different ways. Reframe. Reconnect with why you do what you do. What are you overlooking in your garden due to impatience? Have a few sparkling seeds been buried under someone else’s dirt? Clear the clutter away. One or two small shifts or tweaks could make all the difference in how you feel about your work, your worth, and your magic.

Taurus: Page of Cups

Dear Taurus, your heart feels like a beautiful pond. One filled with turtles, with dragonflies, water lilies, with glints of sunlight dancing across your surface. In a very small area lies so much intrigue, there are whole worlds to get lost in. At this Full Moon Eclipse, allow yourself to experience loving yourself and accepting yourself in very simple and profound ways. There is a suggestion around listening, and allowing more flexibility into your life at this Full Moon. Submerge yourself in love and in beauty—reminding yourself the whole time that this is who you are, always.

Gemini: 3 of Pentacles

Sparkling Gem, it is your time to be on stage. It is your time to “put yourself out there”, and let others see you. That is, not the performance you, the you that is a hard worker, the you that has serious ideas and visions, and the you that is ready to commit to longer and larger projects. There is a suggestion at this time that some real concrete strides in career and ambition can be made with others. Are you allowing the fact that you need others, and you need to need others, into your consciousness? Are you letting yourself be more vulnerable, both to your desires, and to a larger public? This is a Full Moon with a lot of manifesting potential for you, especially with regards to your work being out in the world, work that inherently serves the collective. Sometimes the hardest part for you is to land on exactly what you want. To step into how you need to show up for yourself and for others. Take the time at this Full Moon to really commit to your own dreams on a tangible level. It could really pay off in the next 3-6 months.

Cancer: Knight of Swords

Cancer, think of yourself as a beach. Sometimes, when the beach isn’t private or protected, when someone forgot to close the gate, lots of trash washes up on the shore. Your energy as of late might have felt scattered, your mental arena might have been a bit foggy due to influences outside of you. Clearing your energy and mentally resetting is very favored at this Full Moon. The trash on your beach might also be convenient distractions, stopping you from moving ahead into what you really want to say, who you really wish to be, what you really ought to be sharing. Use the energy of the Knight of Swords at this time to cut through the fog, move through distractions, and forge ahead in your truth. You’ve got many clear messages inside of you guiding you. Listen to them. You’ve got many clear messages that others need to hear, on a collective level. Tune into your truths, and remember that your words are spells as you go forward with focus.

Leo: Ace of Cups

Lovely Leo, there are reverberations of love all around you. It is your season, after all. The Ace of Cups is asking you to be more gentle with definitions of self-love. Love shows up in the pleases and thank yous. There is an ask to let go of any distrust you might have around love. Around only being worthy of being loved in certain times. Love as reward, or expectation, could have been affecting your own expectations of how you show up. This Full Moon, can you let any of this distrust go, and accept that people wish to love you, to hold you, and accept you just as you are? Love can show up in the quiet moments. Love can regenerate inside of you with each breath. Look for the love and you will see it is all around you, because it flows out of you freely.

Virgo: Four of Cups

Virgo, sometimes it can be hard for you to change course once you’ve committed, mentally and emotionally. Honestly, it is really one of your most beautiful qualities: the ability to follow through, to show up, and to do the work dutifully. At this time though, there are a lot of changes ready to take place. These changes first start with you noticing. These changes begin once you allow different ways of relating, of relaying, and of reacting into your subconscious. It is also time for you to reframe how you view change, and what that means for you emotionally. You know, on an abstract level, that change is almost always good, and even if it isn’t, well, there isn’t much you can do about it, if things are changing around you. You also fundamentally know that everything, everywhere, is always changing. But have you let yourself change? Have you let yourself see new ways of showing up, new ways of accessing your intuition, new ways of expressing yourself? Start there. Let the gifts of your internal change, let the gifts of your letting this change happen, wash over you at this Full Moon Lunar Eclipse like rainbow waterfalls.

Libra: 7 of Wands

You are in a transition time, Libra, between two levels of energy, between different stages of desire. There is always the pull to want to go back, to stay in the old ways, to go back into the ways of being that were safer, into the desires that you subconsciously knew would happen. Now you are being asked to expand your desires, to follow your inspiration, to go into riskier territory: risky because it is truly the territory that YOU want, not what you think others want you to want. Follow those threads. Be gentle with yourself if you want to look back. Don’t let yourself stay there for long, however. There is true transformation up ahead next month that it is time for you to activate.

Scorpio: 9 of Wands

You did it, Scorpio! You are almost there! Well, you are almost to a place where you can finally pause, after a long period of work. Finally melt into the very real outcome that you very much created. This was created with your blood, sweat, and tears, with your repeated hours, consistent refinement, laser-beam focus. The issue is you might be so very in it, that you can’t enjoy it. If you are feeling burned out, betrayed, or exhausted, tend to your body first. Rest up. Examine where your energy is needlessly draining away, and where it needs to be protected. This is a Full Moon Lunar Eclipse that asks you to integrate flow and gentleness to your work ethic. Maybe before the next victory lap, could there be less self-flagellation in your due dates? This is a Full Moon Lunar Eclipse that is asking you to celebrate your accomplishments thus far. There will be many, many more to celebrate. Sink into this trust. Let yourself be transformed by how very far you’ve come this year.

Sagittarius: King of Cups

Sagittarius, if you have been feeling inclined to write a book, write an album, publish a suite of drawings or design or any other tangible, creative expression of your emotions, your vision, and your downloads, the King of Cups here is a big, resounding YES to do so. This Full Moon wants you to pay attention to and work with the inspiration that is flowing from you and that is of you. The King of Cups also asks us to do the tricky dance of both protecting our boundaries and remaining open enough to let others in, to feel connected to friendships and family and the collective. This could be an optimal time to spend equal parts with yourself and your creative urges, and with others who show you how important supportive relationships really are. Meditate in the morning, create in the afternoon, and cook dinner for your loved ones in the evening. Share yourself and your creative gifts freely and watch you eclipse your own visions of what your gifts to the collective can be.

Capricorn: 6 of Swords Reversed

Capricorn, this is a Full Moon that asks you to come back around to yourself in a different way. To accept that you are a haven to yourself, and that you don’t need to do more or push harder or change something to settle softly into this knowledge. This is a Full Moon to refine this safety in self. This is also possibly a Full Moon Lunar Eclipse to wrap up some unfinished business. It is always optimal to move forward, but not when there are karmic loose ends to tie up. Not when you have a nagging tug about what you haven’t said, or didn’t do, that pops up sometimes when you are doing the dishes or walking down the aisle of the grocery store. Sometimes you find yourself escaping into excuses and into work. Sometimes you are so good at shaking it off that you miss the growth and lessons that want to make their way into your life. If you’ve got some matters of the heart to attend to, particularly if it involves relationships that are important to you in some way, or ways of showing up that mean something to you, this is the time to invest in the growth that comes with accountability and vulnerability.

Aquarius: King of Swords

Aquarius, the energy coursing through your body at this time is aligned. The insights you are receiving might feel effortless. Really, they are a result of your dedication to clear vision. To seeing beyond the fog into pure potential and possibility. Of staying the course, even when it feels hard, or actually alienates you at times. They are reminding you of your power and of your voice. This could be a Full Moon Lunar Eclipse where very clear messages about how you apply your gifts to the collective come through. Trust those reminders—in fact, look for them to be uncovered. Then through the next few months start disseminating those messages, and your gifts, in tangible ways for others to be inspired by.

Pisces: Page of Pentacles

Pisces, you are the one you have been waiting for. This is the truth. In your case, you’ve sometimes let external validation (or the lack of it) hold you back. Here’s the message at this Full Moon: it all comes back to you and how much you can stay present and grounded for both the mundane and the mystical. It all comes back to your magic: your energy, your self work, and how you access your unique powers. You are a time bender. A magical shape shifter. Once you’ve decided you are doing something, you make the impossible possible so quickly that it sometimes makes other people’s heads spin! Remember this, particularly if you have forgotten about that particular superpower as of late. Reconnect with most present self, your most potent personal power. The stars are the limit once your feet are firmly planted.


Sign up for a reading with Sarah here.
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