Yes, Dracula, There WILL be a SpongeBob Halloween Stop-Motion Special!

by on Jul.23, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

I’m trying really hard not to hyperventilate while typing this because I’m just SO EXCITED to learn that The Legend of Boo-kini Bottom is coming to your television (via Nickolodeon) this October AAAAAHHHHHH!!!!!! While I was a wee bachelor’s student, running around CalArts and learning the joys and rigors of Experimental Animation, there was this GUY.

His name was Steve Hillenburg, and every time I was running in and out of the lab, he was working on his stuff. 

He was eleven years older than me, which felt super OLD, and super SMART. People even FIVE years older than you when you’re 18 seem like demigods. Where I felt pulled in all directions and trying to hush my overwhelmed mind, Steve’s presence in the Experimental Animation department was quiet, strong and steady. He did not mess around, he put pencil and pen to paper everyday to build his film, frame by frame. I watched it happen, wondering what he was up to, and then one day, it was ready! Here’s one of the films I saw him hand-drawing all those days at his desk, it’s called The Green Beret. 

So anyway, that GUY I went to school with invented SpongeBob Squarepants, and you can just SEE in the style, the humor, every last pitch perfect observation of a hilarious cartoon underwater weirdo world just couldn’t come from any brain but Steve’s. If you haven’t seen the Spongebob Squarepants Holiday Special, it’s well done, and such a love letter to the Rankin Bass stop-motion animation specials of old. I can’t wait to see this Halloween Treat from an ol’ school chum!  

(From L-R) Mr. Krabs, Flying Dutchman, Plankton, Squidward, Sandy, SpongeBob SquarePants and Patrick in Nickelodeon’s stop-motion special, SpongeBob SquarePants: The Legend of Boo-Kini Bottom. Credit: Screen Novelties/Nickelodeon© 2017 Viacom International, Inc. All Rights

Leave a Comment more...

Multifaceted & Manifold: Healing Through Orgasms With Chakrubs Crystal Sex Toys

by on Jul.21, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Chakrubs

The first time I read about Chakrubs crystal sex toys I honestly scoffed at it a bit, but couldn’t get it out of my mind. I remember standing in a book and crystal shop in Boston last year with a friend and quietly asking her if she had also heard of it, and we both had a moment of  “Yeah, now we’ve seen everything … but have you tried them?”. Eventually, I ordered one for myself. I started with the obsidian Original Xaga, and upon opening the package, I was instantly intimidated. It’s a beautiful object, a solid, shiny smooth black, that has a formidable weight to it – not just a physical weight, but a serious pull from it. I timidly brought it with me to my bedroom and quickly lost all apprehension: I felt a shock when it first touched me, and I was literally brought to my knees by its effects. It radiates an intense energy that translates to its personal usage: each orgasm it produces is hyper amplified by the properties of the crystal, and each usage strengthens your connection to the Chakrub.

To share this experience with you, Haute Macabre and Chakrubs are offering one reader an obsidian Xaga Curve from the Shadow Line, and is offering all of our readers a 15% discount off of your purchase at chakrubs.com with code “HauteMacabre15”. Read on with my conversation with Chakrubs founder Vanessa Cuccia and find out entry details at the end of the post.

Can you tell us why you started Chakrubs? Why crystals?
After years of working with Chakrubs I’ve discovered that it is part of my soul’s path. The crystals asked me to bring them to this light as part of the process for Divine Feminine Awakening. Many of my life experiences (if not all of them), were leading me to be the conduit for the crystals to do this sacred work. When I first had the idea, it was back in 2011 when I was living with a spiritual teacher and working at a sex toy shop. I had taken the job at the sex toy shop to put myself around knowledgeable, sex-positive people, who could help me understand my own sexual hang-ups. I found myself being interested in their products, they carried everything; high-end vibrators, lingerie, books, you name it. But I realized at one point that I needed more than an orgasm. While pleasure was very important to me, I knew that along my journey with sexuality, I had subconsciously learned to dissociate from my body. I needed to un-learn this, I needed to connect with myself. So, one night I went with my spiritual teacher friend to a woman’s house and she brought out a crystal-wand. Something “clicked” within me, and I realized with a few adjustments it could be used as a sex toy. The name “Chakrubs” entered my mind almost immediately, and my life changed. Crystals felt like a more intimate material to use than anything that was currently available at the store – silicone, stainless steel, wood, glass, squishy jelly-like substances. Crystals are beautiful, natural, they carry the history of the earth, as well as properties for well-being. I wanted this tool for my own sexual and energetic healing, and I felt strongly that if I wanted it, others would, too.

What is a yoni egg?
Yoni is a sanskrit term that represents the vulva, or “sacred space”. A yoni egg is a crystal polished in the form of an egg for a person to hold inside. It can be worn as a tool for physical exercise, strengthening the vaginal muscles while also teaching to create a full range of motion when learning to release the egg. Advanced users may even do vaginal weight lifting, yoga, or other practices. It is an ancient Chinese system traditionally used with jade crystal. I like to think of it as a way to deepen the connection we have to ourselves by creating awareness of our sexual energy through the use of the crystal.

Chakrubs

What does each crystal signify?
Every crystal has different metaphysical properties that we go in depth of on our website, chakrubs.com. For example, rose quartz is associated with the heart and is beneficial for soothing heartache, while amethyst is good for people who suffer with addictive personalities. Crystals can also be charged with intentions, so if you create a focused wish with a crystal, it becomes infused with that energy.

What are your favorites?
I love the Chakrub Prism. It is made from clear quartz, which is considered the master healer stone. It brings me clarity and also holds rainbows inside…so pretty!!!

Chakrubs

What was your first experience with crystal sex?
The first Chakrub I used was the rabbit jade. It’s white, and I’ve always seen it as a “virginity stone”. I was nervous, this was something that started as an idea, and now I was going to try it in real life. It felt. Damn. Good. On so many levels. I can’t explain. My only wish is that I had thought of this when I was first learning about sexuality as a young woman. To be able to keep this talisman forever as the first thing to ever enter me. But that is kind of what it was; I was taking my own virginity once again, reclaiming my body, communing with the earth and the source of creation with my creation. It was sweet, potent, magical. It was meaningful to me and thinking about it drives me to create more channels for people to be open to this type of sexual discovery, so, as a side note, thank you again, for this interview.

Chakrubs Tell us about the “removing shame” experiment you talk about in the Chakrubs bio.
As part of my own healing process when it came to Chakrubs, I focused on releasing shame I felt with my sexuality. Because of the nature of Chakrubs and our brand ethos, they symbolize taking ownership of this intimate aspect of who we are. Chakrubs are meant to be treated as sacred tools in which to unlock our sensual potential. Through creating rituals of pleasure with Chakrubs, it changed the way I felt about my desires, taking pride in it rather than shaming it.

Can you tell us about sex magic energy? Do you feel like it’s a ritual best practiced alone or with a partner?
Sex Magic is when you channel sexual energy to create a desired outcome through focused intention and heightened states of energetic vibration. I think there are benefits to performing sex magic rituals with a partner as well as alone. If you’re wanting to perform sex magic but don’t necessarily have a partner who is interested in this kind of work, Chakrubs come in handy as an added energy amplifier to the practice. Sex magic with a partner can be quite powerful as long as communication and consent is the cornerstone of the ritual.

Chakrubs

Are Chakrubs a sexual magic “battery”? Do you feel that they store and release sexual magic energy and, if so, how?
Crystals are amplifiers of energy as well as storers of energy – like little earth computers. When you build up your sexual energy with a Chakrub, you are infusing the crystal with that orgasmic energy. The more you infuse it with that energy, the more powerful and bonded you will feel to yourself and the crystal.

Chakrubs

What do you hope Chakrubs users experience (orgasms and more!)
I hope Chakrub users experience a deep connection to themselves through pleasure and the support of the crystal. I want them to feel empowered to feel, to desire, to create magic within themselves that looks like themselves.

Do you have a personal sex magic ritual and/or a reading list you would share with our readers?
A simple ceremony I do is creating an intention and then stating that intention at height of sexual pleasure with the Chakrub. As for reading, I think anyone on the path of love should read “The Art of Loving” by Eric Fromm. I’m also currently writing a book right now which will include lots of rituals for this kind of work. I’ll let you know when it comes out!

 

To enter to win a Xaga Curve from the Chakrubs Shadow Line, follow Chakrubs and Haute Macabre on Instagram, and leave us a comment below! We’ll pick a winner at random on Friday, July 28!

Use code “HauteMacabre15” for 15% off your purchase at Chakrubs.com.

Chakrubs

Leave a Comment more...

Good With A Knife: The Papercut Art Of Ivonne Carley

by on Jul.19, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Ivonne Carley_Larentia

San Diego, CA-based artist Ivonne Carley’s enthusiastic penchant for blades might give one pause, if one didn’t know the sort of slicing and slashing that she indulged in. No, this knife-wielding creator is not lurking around shadowy corners chuckling low, awaiting the throat of an unsuspecting passer-by. No, indeed! Ivonne instead has translated this fondness for sharpened edges into an elegant artistic medium for emotive storytelling, with a current focus on paper-cutting and silhouettes – designed to “connect all things in the planar depths of simplicity and translating it into the emotional balance between the dark and the light.”
Still, I like to imagine her cackling softly, as she deftly creates each small cut.

(With apologies to the artist–this intro is not intended to imply that Ivonne Carley might cut a bitch.)

Ivonne Carley_AsAboveSoBelow

Ivonne Carley_AsWithinSoWithout

What twisty (or twisted!) artistic path led to this current focus on paper-cutting and silhouettes? From the time that she was a small child, Ivonne shares, she had a propensity for being fairly accident prone–always the one getting hurt, falling, sticking her hands where they didn’t belong. After a traumatic compound femur fracture as a child which landed her in doctors offices quite a bit, she gained a more than passing familiarity with the medical world– and was of course terrified of anything pointy and prickly. Then, she notes, tattooing and piercings in her 20s changed that all up! “That said,” she adds, “I have always had an interest in the medical realm but not as a career path, so I guess is this one way to scratch that itch.”

“Wielding something sharp, toying and creating with a fetishist undertone. Playing with danger.”

Silhouettes were of interest to her because she enjoys the idea of attempting to tell a story through shadows, texture, light or lack thereof. “There is is much room for the imagination, leaving the idea open to interpretation of who is viewing it.”

Ivonne Carley_Demeter

Ivonne Carley_Lapine

Ivonne’s art is influenced by an interest in the kooky, spooky, occult, and her Mexican heritage. In her pre-teen years, she relocated from Southern CA to Mazatlan, Mexico with her family and lived there for nearly seven years. It was during her time there that she began to explore her interest in art and expose herself to a more culturally appropriate representation of Mexico as well as the art and traditions that are part of that culture. “I was always drawn to high contrast imagery such as lino block printing like the work of Jose Guadalupe Posada. Eventually I became exposed to the art of papel picado, and while it is done for many celebratory occasions, the ones that came around during Dia De Muertos always appealed to me the most.”

Also noting a profound love for religious iconography of all kinds, (one of the few things that stuck around from the Catholic influence she was raised with), Ivonne ruefully adds that “the rules that came with religion never really agreed with me and it bred a lot of defiance and push-back; it only made sense that I found myself swaying towards a darker inclination. It just feels more accepting and comfortable.”

With regard to classic artistic influences, Ivonne lists Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo, MC Escher, and Bosch amongst her key inspirations, and also shares a few current artistic crushes (many of which, I might add, are beloved of the Haute Macabre staff as well!): Elsa Mora, David Stoupakis, Mark Ryden, Darla Teagarden, Christopher Michael Hefner, Nicolas Bruno, Menton3, Becky Munich, Tom Bagshaw, Daniel Martin Diaz, about which, Ivonne enthuses, “I can keep going, here! There is just so much damn awesome talent these days it blows my mind.”

Add all this to Ivonne’s never-ending love for “all things Halloween” and, she declares, “…it’s a tiki drink of spooky. You take it all in and one mug later you’re wasted on the awesome.”

Ivonne Carley Studio 2

Ivonne Carley Studio

I requested of Ivonne a virtual studio visit so that we might see the workspace where these delicate dissections and compositions take place, and if that weren’t pushy enough (you can’t take me anywhere) I asked if she might be moved to divulge any of her artistic routines and rituals as relates to her creativity and craft. Ivonne has kindly spilled a few secrets below (and no doubt has given us a few items to add to our collective wish-lists!)

“My studio is a really small portion of our house. Currently I reside in San Diego, in a quaint little Tudor style cottage with an arched purple door. I share it with my husband, our daughter, and our two feline familiars Gomez and Judas. Due to the nature of my work, I need a lot of natural light so I have a desk that faces a large corner window, looking out to the front of our street. I try, (“try” being the operative word) to keep a relatively clean space but I find paper piling up a lot, until it is time to make a new piece. I have kept the bed that belonged to my departed canine companion under my desk for several years now. I like to keep that space available in case her pooch specter decides to pay a visit.

My ritual usually involves a pretty thorough cleaning of my desk because it eventually turns into paper scrap and confetti central. I usually set the tone with burning some incense of sorts. My personal favorites are: Vampire Blood (I know, cheesy as fuck but it smells so good), Papier d’Arménie, Palo Santo, sage or copal resin I brought back from our travels in Guanajuato. Olfactory tone is so important to me so not only will the room be fragrant but my personal fragrance will reflect my mood and headspace as well. I love all things Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab, and recent favorites are: The Manuscript, Riding Crop Single Note, So Below, and Bulgarian Tobacco. When not doused in that precious, I usually wear By The Fireplace by Maison Margiela Replica, Oud Velvet Mood or Baccarat Rouge 540 from Maison Francis Kurkdijian.

I am an absolute audiophile and cannot function without music in my life. Every part of my day involves music and what I listen to depends on mood, emotion and setting a tone. Creating art has to go hand in hand with music, 100%.

My taste is pretty broad but most of what I listen to falls under the umbrella of IDM, shoegaze and electronic genres. Here are a few things I have listened to (read: played into the damn ground) while creating…”

The Soundtrack to Only Lovers Left Alive
Cigarettes After Sex
Nothing (their whole catalog)
Drab Majesty – The Demonstration
Slowdive (all the Slowdive)
Ben Lukas Boysen – Spells
Author and Punisher
Survive
Lorn
The Haxan Cloak
Lights Out Asia
and always and forever, The Cure

I can keep going here…it sounds all snobby but I also love me a good session of pop, 80’s, His Purple Highness and hair metal bands \m/”

Ivonne Carley_Stheno

Since we are on the subject of rituals, Ivonne recently created some splendidly witchy pieces for Ars Memoria’s Toil and Trouble show in April of this year. Regarding how this theme inspired her specific contributions, Carley explains that “Toil & Trouble was a lot of fun to work on because the subject just felt so comfortable. Working with Catherine Matthews as a curator was a breezy dream and the other two artists involved, Bella Harris and Sophia Rapata – we all had a similar umbrella to work under. We agreed on a witchy and magical theme and I took on the concept of the magical being and their familiar; their relationship and connectivity. This was new for me, as most of my work has been incredibly human and feminine in nature… but this time around I opened up to the incorporation of animal elements. This was my first time venturing into more three dimensional work and I couldn’t have been happier with the work produced and the manner in which it was received.”

Reliquary+collection

Between the work she conjured for Toil & Trouble, and Reliquary, her duo show with Carrie Anne Hudson in October of 2016, Ivonne found herself requiring a small creative break. “Reliquary was very intimate in nature”, she observes, “and for me, personally, there is such thing as too much output especially when you’re creating work as a form of personal therapy. I took a step back this year to continue doing more soul searching and really focus on quality over quantity.”

Aside from several group shows she has lined up, and some potential collaborative work, she is taking the month of August off to spend in Japan with her family–and is very much looking forward to the inspiration that will come from it. After that, she concludes, “Fall and the Halloween season always bring on the most inspiration for me, it is after all the most wonderful time of the year! I expect my shop to be filled with lots of goodies by then.”

Find Ivonne Carley: website // Instagram // Facebook

.

Leave a Comment more...

Christina Mrozik: Metamorphosis, Quietus, and In-betweens

by on Jul.18, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Although I can’t remember when I first discovered the work of Midwest-born, Portland, OR-based artist Christina Mrozik, I know I was already aware of her the first time I got to see some of it in person, right here in Portland at a group exhibition at the Antler Gallery in 2016. That was where I met a marvelously surreal piece, rendered in ballpoint pen, entitled Beheld:

Christina Mrozik - My Beheld

There was a moment of revulsion upon first noticing that this grass-haired woman’s eyes had become bird eggs, each cozy in a nest, an expression of awe upon her face. But that moment quickly gave way to wonder as I considered the symbolic significance of having nests for eye sockets and eggs for eyes. Eggs are symbols of new life, of beginnings, of the universe; they’re full of potential, representing both nascency and transformation. To me this piece depicts a moment of tremendous realization and the symbolism is breathtakingly beautiful.

I left the gallery that afternoon with my first Christina Mrozik print, a collaborative piece entitled Root And Marrow that she created with another wonderful Portland-based artist named Zoe Keller:

Christina Mrozik and Zoe Keller - Root and Marrow

Depicting the skeletal remains of a cat curled inside a ring of gold leaf, numerous butterflies emerge in sequence from cocoons along its tail and spine and a morning glory vine grows around its neck. Root and Marrow is as much a work of memento mori as it is a reminder that death nourishes new life and nature always finds a way.

Christina Mrozik My Apology

In-between states and transformations are often part of Mrozik’s work, incorporating flora and dissected fauna into her visual explorations of the human condition, which she creates using graphite, ink, marker, watercolor, and high pigmented acrylics as her media. As conveyed by her art, Mrozik is keenly aware of our mortality, of our inherent fragility and resilience both physically and emotionally, of how we’re often in states of flux or transition, struggling with conflicting aspects of ourselves or each other, seeking balance, seeking connection.

Christina Mrozik - THE HEART KEEPS LOOKING FOR ITSELF

Christina Mrozik - TEACH US TO CARE AND NOT TO CARE

Animals partially dissected, their flesh, muscle, and bone separated yet intertwined, serve as visceral representations of the struggles of living with pain and illness, the continuous dance of awareness of body and mind. While animal bodies made partially or entirely of grass, “the only plant that can be taken down to its roots repeatedly and with intense frequency and still thrive,” symbolize our own endurance and resilience.

Christina Mrozik - OUR EMBRACE

Cristina Mrozik - THE WEIGHT OF BEINGS

Mrozik creates marvelously surreal combinations of flora and fauna, predators and prey, that symbolize our ongoing efforts, both conscious and unconscious, to grow and change and become.

Christina Mrozik - ANTHESIS

“There is a name for every season, for every connection and moment. It’s buried deep, often unspeakable, but a knowledge we carry nonetheless. ‘Anthesis’ is the name for the time period in which a bud blooms, and while it is a technical term, I can’t help but apply it to all of the short bursting moments in my own life and something long cultivated came forth. There is surprise and mystery even within ourselves, and we are connected to it by invisible words; tied to it by invisible threads.”

Christina Mrozik - Bloom

Christina Mrozik - Epoch

One of my personal favorites of Mrozik’s recent work (and another print I’m proud to own) is the Keeper of Malady, a snow-white corvid whose body is abloom in white anemones and oriental poppies. Spiderwebs and strands of spider silk stream from between its petals as a single white spider extends a leg to tenderly touch one of the bird’s claws.

Christina Mrozik - THE KEEPER OF MALADY

 

Existing in the shadow world, this extraordinary creature is a caretaker, a keeper, a gentle friend:

“It knows every sickness in every body and it holds the memory of hurt. It is commonly believed that this creature is dark, a monster of ill spirit and malice, but according to the Ancient Wisdoms it is rather made of light and blossoms. It is a tender thing, with the embodied knowledge that pain does not separate us from beauty but rather binds us to it. It whispers reminders of self grace when things are just too hard, and sweetly reminds us how to bloom again from the darkness of the dirt.”

Christina Mrozik Enfold

Christina Mrozik’s artwork is of that magical sort that makes the world around me go very still and quiet. Even those pieces which convey pain and distress also contain a singular, reassuring peace. Here the myriad processes of growth and becoming are vital experiences, growing pains, scars, and all, and death is very much a part of life, not something to be feared.

Find Christina Mrozik: Website // Shop // Instagram // Facebook // Twitter // Tumblr

Leave a Comment more...

Christina Mrozik: Metamorphosis, Quietus, and In-betweens

by on Jul.18, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Although I can’t remember when I first discovered the work of Midwest-born, Portland, OR-based artist Christina Mrozik, I know I was already aware of her the first time I got to see some of it in person, right here in Portland at a group exhibition at the Antler Gallery in 2016. That was where I met a marvelously surreal piece, rendered in ballpoint pen, entitled Beheld:

Christina Mrozik - My Beheld

There was a moment of revulsion upon first noticing that this grass-haired woman’s eyes had become bird eggs, each cozy in a nest, an expression of awe upon her face. But that moment quickly gave way to wonder as I considered the symbolic significance of having nests for eye sockets and eggs for eyes. Eggs are symbols of new life, of beginnings, of the universe; they’re full of potential, representing both nascency and transformation. To me this piece depicts a moment of tremendous realization and the symbolism is breathtakingly beautiful.

I left the gallery that afternoon with my first Christina Mrozik print, a collaborative piece entitled Root And Marrow that she created with another wonderful Portland-based artist named Zoe Keller:

Christina Mrozik and Zoe Keller - Root and Marrow

Depicting the skeletal remains of a cat curled inside a ring of gold leaf, numerous butterflies emerge in sequence from cocoons along its tail and spine and a morning glory vine grows around its neck. Root and Marrow is as much a work of memento mori as it is a reminder that death nourishes new life and nature always finds a way.

Christina Mrozik My Apology

In-between states and transformations are often part of Mrozik’s work, incorporating flora and dissected fauna into her visual explorations of the human condition, which she creates using graphite, ink, marker, watercolor, and high pigmented acrylics as her media. As conveyed by her art, Mrozik is keenly aware of our mortality, of our inherent fragility and resilience both physically and emotionally, of how we’re often in states of flux or transition, struggling with conflicting aspects of ourselves or each other, seeking balance, seeking connection.

Christina Mrozik - THE HEART KEEPS LOOKING FOR ITSELF

Christina Mrozik - TEACH US TO CARE AND NOT TO CARE

Animals partially dissected, their flesh, muscle, and bone separated yet intertwined, serve as visceral representations of the struggles of living with pain and illness, the continuous dance of awareness of body and mind. While animal bodies made partially or entirely of grass, “the only plant that can be taken down to its roots repeatedly and with intense frequency and still thrive,” symbolize our own endurance and resilience.

Christina Mrozik - OUR EMBRACE

Cristina Mrozik - THE WEIGHT OF BEINGS

Mrozik creates marvelously surreal combinations of flora and fauna, predators and prey, that symbolize our ongoing efforts, both conscious and unconscious, to grow and change and become.

Christina Mrozik - ANTHESIS

“There is a name for every season, for every connection and moment. It’s buried deep, often unspeakable, but a knowledge we carry nonetheless. ‘Anthesis’ is the name for the time period in which a bud blooms, and while it is a technical term, I can’t help but apply it to all of the short bursting moments in my own life and something long cultivated came forth. There is surprise and mystery even within ourselves, and we are connected to it by invisible words; tied to it by invisible threads.”

Christina Mrozik - Bloom

Christina Mrozik - Epoch

One of my personal favorites of Mrozik’s recent work (and another print I’m proud to own) is the Keeper of Malady, a snow-white corvid whose body is abloom in white anemones and oriental poppies. Spiderwebs and strands of spider silk stream from between its petals as a single white spider extends a leg to tenderly touch one of the bird’s claws.

Christina Mrozik - THE KEEPER OF MALADY

 

Existing in the shadow world, this extraordinary creature is a caretaker, a keeper, a gentle friend:

“It knows every sickness in every body and it holds the memory of hurt. It is commonly believed that this creature is dark, a monster of ill spirit and malice, but according to the Ancient Wisdoms it is rather made of light and blossoms. It is a tender thing, with the embodied knowledge that pain does not separate us from beauty but rather binds us to it. It whispers reminders of self grace when things are just too hard, and sweetly reminds us how to bloom again from the darkness of the dirt.”

Christina Mrozik Enfold

Christina Mrozik’s artwork is of that magical sort that makes the world around me go very still and quiet. Even those pieces which convey pain and distress also contain a singular, reassuring peace. Here the myriad processes of growth and becoming are vital experiences, growing pains, scars, and all, and death is very much a part of life, not something to be feared.

Find Christina Mrozik: Website // Shop // Instagram // Facebook // Twitter // Tumblr

Leave a Comment more...

Elemental- Iris Van Herpen Takes Our Breath Away

by on Jul.17, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=GiYtEgY2WZE

Iris Van Herpen’s Aeriform collection explores the elemental nature of air and water. Flowing over and around the models, Van Herpen’s signature structural forms mimic bubbles, waveforms, splashes- places where air and water meet and mingle.

download

The show, however, goes beyond the collection. As a visceral foil to the playful lightness of the collection, Van Herpen chose Dutch musical performance group Between Music and their ‘hypnotic biophonic sound sculpture’,  Aquasonic. Encased in glass boxes onstage, the performers hang suspended in water like specimens in a museum. The result is like some kind of Damien Hirst orchestral nightmare, full of beautifully unfamiliar instruments and a sense of deeply claustrophobic terror.

maxresdefault

aquasonic-20150608-3

Leave a Comment more...

Life in Death at Tower Hamlets Cemetery

by on Jul.14, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_2

What better way to escape summer heat, than to lose oneself in history for a few languid hours, sheltered by centuries-old trees and occasionally tangled in overgrown ivy. Amidst the veritable cornucopia of London’s lush green spaces are some unlikely constituents: cemeteries. The most beautiful of these are known as The Magnificent Seven, and I’ve made it my mission to explore them all.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_24

Tower Hamlets Cemetery park, like its six sisters, was established in the Victorian era to ease overcrowding in small parish graveyards. It’s home to hundreds of thousands of bodies (around 350,000, to be specific), due to the popularity of public graves at the time of its establishment – some graves are said to be forty feet deep and contain dozens of people, many of them complete strangers.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_27

Just 55 years after opening its gates, the twenty-seven-acre plot began to show signs of the neglect that would spur its descent into ruin.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_35

Still, it remained functional well into the 1960s, surviving five bombings during the Second World War and eventually becoming an official Local Nature Reserve.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_47

Though many tombstones have been destroyed or fell victim to the ravages of time, carving connoisseurs can still admire gorgeous reliefs of clasped hands, weeping angels and falling doves.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_34

And while some urns draped with stone flower garlands, Latin crosses, broken columns and other ornate, moss-grown Victorian monuments still stand, they’re slowly disappearing beneath vines, roots and blooms.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_131

Today, Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park is habitat to numerous plant and animal species, some rare and endangered – more a burgeoning woodland than a place of final rest. Visitors can unwind amidst wildflower meadows, observe wildlife, or even acquire permission to responsibly forage the grounds for natural offerings like herbs, flowers, berries and mushrooms (for personal use only and adhering to guidelines, of course).

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_73

On a summer day, the chorus of birds and countless sun dapples dancing across melting limestone make it easy to forget the somber origins of Tower Hamlets. Life has overtaken this place of death completely, in some cases quite literally. Yet the crumbling monuments remind us: the two flow side by side, and they both belong.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_126

Many more photos from my visit to Tower Hamlet Cemetery Park can be seen here.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_32

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_46

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_42

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_33

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_23

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_48

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_18

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_21

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_16

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_17

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_60

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_61

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_24

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_55

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_57

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_49

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_45

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_50

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_51

Leave a Comment more...

Life in Death at Tower Hamlets Cemetery

by on Jul.14, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_2

What better way to escape summer heat, than to lose oneself in history for a few languid hours, sheltered by centuries-old trees and occasionally tangled in overgrown ivy. Amidst the veritable cornucopia of London’s lush green spaces are some unlikely constituents: cemeteries. The most beautiful of these are known as The Magnificent Seven, and I’ve made it my mission to explore them all.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_24

Tower Hamlets Cemetery park, like its six sisters, was established in the Victorian era to ease overcrowding in small parish graveyards. It’s home to hundreds of thousands of bodies (around 350,000, to be specific), due to the popularity of public graves at the time of its establishment – some graves are said to be forty feet deep and contain dozens of people, many of them complete strangers.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_27

Just 55 years after opening its gates, the twenty-seven-acre plot began to show signs of the neglect that would spur its descent into ruin.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_35

Still, it remained functional well into the 1960s, surviving five bombings during the Second World War and eventually becoming an official Local Nature Reserve.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_47

Though many tombstones have been destroyed or fell victim to the ravages of time, carving connoisseurs can still admire gorgeous reliefs of clasped hands, weeping angels and falling doves.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_34

And while some urns draped with stone flower garlands, Latin crosses, broken columns and other ornate, moss-grown Victorian monuments still stand, they’re slowly disappearing beneath vines, roots and blooms.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_131

Today, Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park is habitat to numerous plant and animal species, some rare and endangered – more a burgeoning woodland than a place of final rest. Visitors can unwind amidst wildflower meadows, observe wildlife, or even acquire permission to responsibly forage the grounds for natural offerings like herbs, flowers, berries and mushrooms (for personal use only and adhering to guidelines, of course).

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_73

On a summer day, the chorus of birds and countless sun dapples dancing across melting limestone make it easy to forget the somber origins of Tower Hamlets. Life has overtaken this place of death completely, in some cases quite literally. Yet the crumbling monuments remind us: the two flow side by side, and they both belong.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_126

Many more photos from my visit to Tower Hamlet Cemetery Park can be seen here.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_32

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_46

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_42

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_33

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_23

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_48

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_18

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_21

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_16

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_17

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_60

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_61

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_24

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_55

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_57

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_49

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_45

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_50

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_51

Leave a Comment more...

An Old Film/Music Treat for You!

by on Jul.13, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

Well well well, whaddya know, it’s 2017, and the Gothtober worm turns! Time to gather some wood and start a fire for the cauldron. While we’re doing that, we’ve got something for you to watch.

From 1937, here’s a little something to share, a somewhat pastoral and stressful animated evaluation of an abandoned windmill’s structural integrity during a passing storm. Will the windmill’s delicate eco system of residents survive the weather’s blustering braggadocio? Well we honestly just don’t know!!! It’s a stressful movie, because there’s a whole situation involving a mother bird and a water wheel that is not for the faint of heart. This film, a favorite of  Hayao Miyazaki’s, is beautiful because of it’s lush colors and painterly style, along with an appreciation for creatures of the night and their engrossing nocturnal antics.

Johann Strauss II (1825 — 1899)

The Silly Symphonies cartoons were intended to accompany larger features, all of them set to compelling musical soundtracks. This film uses “One Day When We Were Young” from Johann Strauss II’s operetta The Gypsy Baron. The Gypsy Baron is quite a fun operetta featuring mistaken identity, young lovers, old lovers, comic rustics, and buried treasure! It still gets played quite a bit today. Strauss the younger is possibly the most popular composter of all time, his nickname being “The Waltz King.” If you’d like to see this piece conducted by one of the 20th century’s greatest conductors (Carlos Kleiber) lead the Vienna Phil in performing it, by all means, check this out! At 6:13 you can hear the clarinet performing one of the most difficult excerpts in the history of the instrument, a sassy A-G#-F#-G#-A-F#-B-F#!!!

But THIS Silly Symphony is different than all the others because it is the FIRST to use the multiplane camera! It was a huge game changer in the industry that opened doors to special effects as we know it. Multiplane is basically shooting downward on a “layer cake” of backgrounds and elements on transparent glass platens. Pieces are tracked and animated at different speeds and distances, giving the impression of 3-D, although not stereoscopic (to be clear). It was invented by the largely overlooked and terribly under-appreciated animation titan, Ub Iwerks, then of Disney studios. The technology was further refined throughout the late thirties, officially tested on The Old Mill (seen above) which won an Academy Award for Animated Short Film in 1937. Multiplane was then used to make Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, Pinnochio, Cinderella, Peter Pan, and many other films. Now we have digital multiplane cameras, the last animated film to use multiplane the old-fashioned way was Disney’s Little Mermaid.

Leave a Comment more...

Solstice Scents Spring 2017 Collection

by on Jul.13, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Gin_Flower_EDP

I don’t know about you all, but summer is here in full force down in the swamps and I am flaming-flushed, feverish, and ready to die. I don’t even exaggerate–you can drown under the weight of your own scalding sweat here, if you don’t spontaneously combust first!  So now would seem the perfect time to do a bit of scented time travel, and immerse ourselves in the bracing breezes, restorative rainstorms, and sweetly riotous blooms of our recent Spring–Solstice Scents 2017 Spring Collection, to be precise.

(Read more about this visionary indie perfumer and their wildly imaginative aromatic enchantments in our previous feature, here.)

Gin Flower, pictured above: (Osmanthus, Elderflower, Apricot, Vanilla, Juniper, Lime, Manuka Honey Accord (Vegan), Pear, Citron, Hawaiian Sandalwood) Ok, so if you ever invite me out for a drink, and maybe I step away to powder my nose just as you happen to get the bartender’s attention–you can never go wrong with ordering a stiff gin & tonic for me. Ever since I took a sip of my grandmother’s G&T at the tender age of four and promptly burst into tears (I thought it was a tumbler of ice water!) I’ve been both obsessed and repelled by this crisp, classic cocktail. There’s something about the aromatic, pine-y gin, the bitter quinine of the tonic, and the sour, zesty astringence of that essential twist of lime that has me both “ahhhh-ing” with satisfaction while simultaneously pulling that “blech!” face. Gin Flower is based off a gin and St. Germain elderflower liqueur cocktail and is the first in a series of cocktail perfumes at Solstice Scents. It starts off with a piquant blast of juniper that is immediate and prominent and takes me back to that first quaff of my grandmother’s acrid aperitif, but shortly softens to a citrus-y, honeyed floral and sweet woods that wears very close to the skin.

After_the_Rain

After The Rain: (Lilac, Wisteria, Blue Lotus, Rain, Green Accord, Wild Violets, Earth) Is a misty watercolor painting of a fragrance, conjuring romantic visions of an elegant lady of the manor looking up from her ledgers to wistfully gaze out at her garden on a cool, rainy morning in early spring. Delicate, purple florals, restrained greenery, and the ghostly tracing of rainwater on a chilled glass windowpane. I wouldn’t quite call this an aquatic, but I hesitate to call to call it a floral. Can we pretend that there is a category of fragrance called “haunting breeze?”

blossomjamedp

Blossom Jam Tea Cakes: (Southern Tea Cakes, Petit Fours, Floral Infused Jams & Preserves and a Delicate Aroma of Tea)  I am not generally a fan of gourmands, but I do know that Solstice Scents always hits the mark with their delectable dessert-influenced fragrances… and though perhaps Blossom Jam Tea Cakes is not–initially– my cup of tea, I can recognize that it’s a lovely portrayal of these dainty tea-time delicacies. Fluffy cakes, jammy preserves, and, later, the rich sweetness of buttercream round out this fragrance. Several hours later I catch whiffs of a plastic-y vanilla from wrist, and that is fine with me; it reminds me of sniffing the heads of my Strawberry Shortcake dolls when I was a little girl, and it’s a comforting reminder that sometime a little sweetness can be a very nice thing.

chiffon_EDP

Chiffon: (Vanilla, White Amber, White Musk & Lemon Myrtle EO) At first spray this is LEMON– a bright, tart, enormous face-punch of tangy yellow juice and sour, citric acid. What’s interesting is that it dissipates almost immediately and an airy sweetness emerges, which becomes a whipped cream/marshmallow note as it lingers upon the skin. Chiffon is a “dual concept fragrance” that brings together the sweet and refreshingly tart taste of Lemon Chiffon pie and the wispy beauty of chiffon fabric.
Cameo_EDP

Cameo: (Almond, Rose, Yellow Cake, Tonka Bean, Coconut, Ginger and Red Orange) Creamy almond cake batter with rose petals, softly folded in. The oven is still heating and as the kitchen warms, the fragrances of lightly spiced ginger and milky, vanillic coconut waft from the bowl. On my skin, this confection never bakes fully through, and all the notes all remain slightly separate throughout the duration of the scent.
mountain_vanillla

Mountain Vanilla: (Sweet Clover, Coumarin, Vanilla Musk, Fresh Green Accord, Poplar Buds, Morning Dew) Described as  “…a coumarin-heavy scent with vanilla and light green elements,” Mountain Vanilla is…not the vanilla that I thought it was going to be! I guess that’s what I get for not reading the full description until just now. Coumarin, if you are wondering, is described as smelling of new-mown hay–and there is definitely a warm, sweetly herbaceous aspect to this fragrance. Don’t be put off by the opening notes, which smelled aggressively chemical to my nose for a few moments; it’s a stinging tang that burns off quickly before those grassy vanilla notes and subtle green nuances materialize. I don’t think I’ve ever smelled anything quite like it; it really does evoke imagery of an Appalachian meadow brimming with sweet clover and dew-dappled ferns and the soft musk of a Bambi or two.

Estate_Vetiver_EDP

Estate Vetiver (Estate Vanilla, Vetiver, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Lime) A perfume for vetiver and patchouli lovers, Estate Vetiver is a dank, dream of a scent that is raw, and narcotic and strange. With this one I smell only what I see in my mind’s eye, which is the damp, rotting splinters of a ship wreck, portentous dark skies and piercing sea breezes, and the lost and vengeful ghosts of two young women haunting a band of rogue pirates. As you can imagine, Estate Vetiver is my favorite among Solstice Scents Spring Collection.

Find Solstice Scents: website // instagram // facebook // twitter

 

Leave a Comment more...

Site Representation Request

If you have a relevant website and wish to be represented on GothicHoliday.com, please send a link to your site with a brief description and be sure to include a note granting permission to include your content. Send requests to netherworldnetwork[at]comcast[dot]net with the subject line "content feed permission" and we will be happy to consider adding your site to our family of associated websites.

Information Content Disclaimer

The views and opinions stated in any and all of the articles represented on this site are solely those of the contributing author or authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of GothicHoliday.com, The Netherworld Network, its parent company or any affiliated companies, or any individual, groups, or companies mentioned in articles on this site.