The Natural History Collection from the Curious Card Company

by on Apr.21, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The Curious Card Co

This latest, eight card collection from The Curious Card Company features vintage print designs of various natural history illustration plates, including botanical flowers and ferns, crystals formations, beetles, moths and butterflies, sea shells, birds, deep sea fish and crustaceans. (fun fact: The colour palette for these cards was inspired by the 1963 movie ‘The Courtship of Eddie’s Father’ starring a very young Ron Howard…)

These beautiful, vintage natural history illustrations have been designed to wrap around onto the back of the greeting card which means you are actually sending a beautiful double sized art print that your loved ones can frame to keep, long after it’s been gifted.

Each luxury greeting card also comes with a matching circular sticker, perfect for envelope decoration or scrapbooking. The Natural History Collection is available to purchase individually or in a set.

Shop online, and Follow the Curious Card Co on Facebook and Instagram

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card CoThe Curious Card Co

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

The Natural History Collection from the Curious Card Company

by on Apr.21, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The Curious Card Co

This latest, eight card collection from The Curious Card Company features vintage print designs of various natural history illustration plates, including botanical flowers and ferns, crystals formations, beetles, moths and butterflies, sea shells, birds, deep sea fish and crustaceans. (fun fact: The colour palette for these cards was inspired by the 1963 movie ‘The Courtship of Eddie’s Father’ starring a very young Ron Howard…)

These beautiful, vintage natural history illustrations have been designed to wrap around onto the back of the greeting card which means you are actually sending a beautiful double sized art print that your loved ones can frame to keep, long after it’s been gifted.

Each luxury greeting card also comes with a matching circular sticker, perfect for envelope decoration or scrapbooking. The Natural History Collection is available to purchase individually or in a set.

Shop online, and Follow the Curious Card Co on Facebook and Instagram

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card Co

The Curious Card CoThe Curious Card Co

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

Savoring the celluloid hues of colorpalette.cinema on Instagram

by on Apr.20, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Color is a uniquely powerful tool in the art of cinematic storytelling. We’re all naturally sensitive to color and its impact doesn’t require our conscious awareness in order to be felt emotionally, psychologically, and even physically. For some filmmakers, the role of color is so important it may as well be considered a character unto itself.

Our fascination with this is beautifully stoked by one of our favorite Instagram accounts, colorpalette.cinema, which is solely devoted to exploring the use of color in movies, one scene at a time.

colorpalette.cinema Fight Club

Kalki, the cinephile behind colorpalette.cinema, selects a single screenshot from a film and then carefully creates a palette revealing all the colors used in that scene, ordered from left to right, in the amount they are employed, from greatest to least.

colorpalette.cinema Only Lovers Left Alive

colorpalette.cinema The Dreamers

At a glance this might seem like a simple exercise, but the more scenes and palettes one examines, the more thoughtful you realise the process is. The beautiful result of this effort – besides the obvious visual pleasure of scratches our respective pantone-minded, color-coordinating itches – is an unveiling of all the layers of aesthetic work that went into each scene. As Kalki described to me,

“With these palettes you can easily see the whole work from the director, the cinematographer, the makeup department, costume designers… and perhaps understand why a certain color scheme was chosen.”

 

colorpalette.cinema Pan's Labyrinth

colorpalette.cinema The VVitch

colorpalette.cinema It Follows

“I just really really love cinema as an art-form, and I find very interesting how colors are used. Since most of the times the audience is caught up by the film, they might not realize, visualize the colors in a certain scene.”

 

colorpalette.cinema Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me

colorpalette.cinema Blade Runner

colorpalette.cinema The Shining

colorpalette.cinema Mad Max Fury Road

We love these scene and palette pairings for even more than the pleasure of marveling at the cinematic artistry at work. They catalyze so much daydreaming as well. What if you painted or decorated a room using the palette from a favorite scene? Or dressed yourself? Or, and we’re looking at you here, our beloved Kat Von D, what if you created eyeshadow palettes based on particular scenes?

colorpalette.cinema Suspiria

colorpalette.cinema The Exorcist

colorpalette.cinema Under the Skin

As you might imagine, it was terribly challenging to select the examples seen here. We strongly recommend sacrificing some time to pore over the entire colorpalette.cinema account. If you’re anything like us, you’ll find yourself writing a mental wish list of scenes as you go. Fortunately, Kalki accepts requests via direct message on Instagram.

colorpalette.cinema Inglourious Basterds

colorpalette.cinema The Texas Chain Saw Massacre

In addition to colorpalette.cinema, Kalki runs two additional film-related Instagram accounts: cinema.magic, a cinema appreciation page full of behind-the-scenes photos and fan art, and stanleykubrick__, a Stanley Kubrick fan page.

colorpalette.cinema Melancholia

colorpalette.cinema The Neon Demon

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

Shadows From The Walls Of Death; Or, That Arsenic You Like Is Going To Come Back In Style

by on Apr.18, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

typical Victorian interior

As a child, and even today, I am utterly transfixed when confronted by ornate wallpaper patterns. I often find myself stopping mid-sentence, entranced, when tracing the intricate imagery with my eye, delighted by surprising things which begin to emerge from the whorls and swirls of the repeating motifs. I always thought it would be a hoot to try and sketch the things I saw contained within those marbled, mottled microcosms, but in the end I never do. Though, artists, I do wish you would steal that idea and make a collaborative coffee table book with your results. I’d be your first customer!

The wallpapered visions of my childhood, in the late 70s through early 80s were pretty trippy, and sometimes gave me nightmares (I was a weird, impressionable kid and I suspect I experience pareidolia), but you know what? For all of my histrionics and delayed bedtimes, at least I can say that they never poisoned me.

Unfortunate souls purportedly poisoned by arsenical wallpapers in the mid-to-late 1800s, however, would no doubt beg to differ.

Wallpaper2

Long regarded as a waste product from mining, and commonly known as a poisonous substance, arsenic nonetheless had myriad uses in the Victorian household: in food and food colorings with which one one ate and entertained, in lady’s soaps and cosmetics applied to one’s person; in the dresses, hats, and stockings that one wore on a daily basis and special occasions; in the painted toys one’s children delightedly played with (and probably put in their mouths, because, children); and not to mention the handy powder used to rid one’s home of vermin…or to rid one’s self of a few pesky relative or two– hence the nickname “inheritance powder”.
And, of course, for interior design.

In 1775 Swedish chemist Carl Scheele developed the vivid green pigment known as Scheele’s green, made from the compound copper arsenite; the depth of color and superb pigmentation made it highly sought after for clothing and interior manufactures–perfect for domestic décor and to color the florid opulence of the paper hangings that were so desired during this period.

Floral motifs, arabesque designs, and trompe l’oeil illusions, as well as panoramic landscapes were the distinctive style of the French designers, whom the British admired for their air of elegance and luxury. The tide was to shift, however, in favor of the British, whose skilled block-printing and imaginative and innovative designs were considered so fashionable that the French employed spies to discover the secrets of the papiers d’Angleterre. Who knew the world of wallpaper manufacture and design was so thrilling? I can almost imagine these creators as contestants on a reality television show…except…there is of course, a deadly twist.

Wallpapers1

During this time, England and many European countries produced wallpaper laced with arsenic. And while several of them were relatively quick to recognize the problem and ban such products—this was not the case for England. Even as the products’ hazards started to become a hot button topic in drawing rooms and gentleman’s clubs, many people actually pooh-poohed these warnings as fear-mongering, as they still believed that these design items somehow differed from purposely toxic arsenic items. It would be several years and many campaigning committees, committed lobbyists, shocking headlines, satirical cartoons, and even a sensationalist novel before opinions were to change.

Over in the US, chemist Robert Kedzie included examples of wallpaper poisoning in his “Poisonous Papers” essay for the Michigan State Board of Health, and as part of a campaign to alert the public to the dangers of arsenical wallpapers, Kedzie collected wallpaper samples from stores in Detroit, Lansing, and Jackson, and hand them trimmed into 100 books, which he distributed to libraries throughout Michigan. Titled Shadows From The Walls Of Death, the books were remarkably effective means of publicizing the dangers of arsenic in wallpaper.

William Morris, an artist and designer associated with both the Pre-Raphaelites and the Arts and Crafts movement, designed some of the most iconic wallpapers of the era (and, incidentally, was the son of the man whose company was the largest arsenic producer in the country).
Like many of his contemporaries, most of Morris’s well-known early designs contained arsenic-based colors and like most Victorians he seems to have experienced a disconnect as it relates to the poisonous arsenic that made the headlines and that which he used in his design pigments for the beautification of people’s homes.  Morris summarily dismissed health concerns about arsenic-based pigments in wallpapers. A letter written by Morris to his dye manufacturer in 1885 states, “a greater folly is hardly possible to imagine: the doctors were bitten by witch fever.”

No problem here, Morris assures us, nothing to see, carry on! A strange and rather blasé attitude from someone thought to be an environmentalist and champion of worker rights and safety provisions.

Nonetheless, Morris & Co. bowed to pressure and removed arsenic from its wallpapers voluntarily in 1880. While in other countries such as Sweden, Denmark, Austria and Italy, it was the development of regulatory measures and legislation prohibiting the use of poisons and other harmful substances, the wallpapers in Britain began to be marketed as arsenic-free “entirely as a result of British demand, rather than by any action of the British government.” As general opinion turned against the companies that used arsenic in their wallpaper colors, “the people of Britain used the power of their pocketbooks to make the presence of arsenic in wallpapers obsolete, and as a result, their homes no longer held a fatal secret.”

Shadows From The Walls of Death

scenic wallpaper by Maison Berbedienne

I’ve been ruminating on the captivating and dangerously beautiful Victorian wallpaper facsimiles in Lucinda Hawksley’s Bitten By Witch Fever for a few months now, and wouldn’t you know– as soon as I sat down to start writing something about it in the last few weeks, not one, but two articles about the very same thing appeared on my radar.  It would seem that this toxic topic holds a macabre fascination for us, even today.

And as usual, such interests are cyclical; back in 2003 Andy Meharg of the University of Aberdeen in Scotland published a piece regarding a chemical analysis performed on an early example of the ‘Trellis’ pattern wallpaper. The Trellis pattern is believed to be Morris’s first wallpaper and was produced from 1864 onwards. In damp rooms, it is believed, fungi living on the wallpaper paste turned the arsenic salts into highly toxic trimethylarsine and sickened people. Reports Meharg: “I analysed the green pigment by energy-dispersive analysis and showed unequivocally that the coloration was caused by a copper arsenic salt.” Interestingly, enough, two years later in 2005,  a Royal Society of Chemistry published an article titled “The toxicity of trimethylarsine: an urban myth” and in attempting to read it, I’ll admit, it’s a bit over my head, but my point is that it would seem to be an enduring obsession.

Let us for now then, gaze at these exquisite plates and wallpaper tiles from the relative safety of our computer screens, or from the pages of Hawksley’s stunning compilation, without fear of “internal irritations”, paralysis, and other mysterious illnesses.

Wallpaper4

Wallpapers5

Wallpapers6

All images, plates, etc, via Bitten By Witch Fever: Wallpaper and Arsenic in the Nineteenth-Century Home by Lucinda Hawksley

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

The Haute List

by on Apr.17, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Leave a Comment more...

It’s What’s Inside That Counts

by on Apr.15, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Leave a Comment more...

Last Chance: Haute Macabre + Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Pre-Sale Ends Tonight

by on Apr.14, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

Spring pre-orders are now open in the Haute Macabre Shop for our exclusive Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab line, including three new permanent additions: our third installment to our Cemetery Collection, Laurel Hill, and Hair Glosses in both the original Haute Macabre fragrance and our most beloved, So Below.

Pre-Orders will be open until Midnight Tonight CST for a May fulfillment

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Laurel Hill

Brand New! Laurel Hill contains notes of mountain laurel petals limned in pale pink settling among boughs of hemlock, soft mosses, and dark lichens.

I spent a hot summer afternoon wandering through Laurel Hill’s rolling hills and green grasses, exploring its inhabitants and watching an intense thunder storm roll in over its gardens, danced with ghosts in an unlocked receiving vault, and collected animal bones that were offered to me. This is my gift back, to share with all of you.

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

The Burying Point is the oldest cemetery in Salem, MA, dating back to the year 1637, bordered by a tribute to the victims of the Salem Witch Trials. I walked through here on a beautiful morning once, and fell in love with the crumbling markers, all decorated with mememto mori markings popular in the era. Our interpretation of it contains notes of damp clusters of brown patchouli, dried maple leaves, black sage, spikenard, and curled, misshapen mandrake roots.

Just above the French Quarter in my beloved New Orleans, St. Louis #1 is one of the oldest cemeteries in the city, and the alleged final resting places of VooDoo Queen Marie Laveau and the cruel Delphine LaLaurie. Bottled here with drooping Spanish moss and crumbling marble, sweet olive blossom, 13-year aged black patchouli, and offerings of Bay Rum, Florida water, and tobacco.

Click Here to visit the Haute Macabre Shop

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

Haute Macabre and Black Phoenix Trading Post are pleased to present to you Hair Gloss, available in the original Haute Macabre fragrance and the beloved So Below.

We have combined Tahitian Moni, Camelina Oil, Argan Oil, and Karanja oil to give your mane a gleaming finishing shine, without feeling weighed down or greasy. Paraben and sulfate free, with no petro-chemicals, GMOs, and no triclosan, and 100% Cruelty Free. One to two sprays onto damp or dry hair will leave your hair glossy and silky, and wrap you in our signature scent that embodies the aesthetic of Haute Macabre: mysterious and dark.

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Trading Post Hair Gloss: So Below

So Below Hair Gloss

Haute Macabre Hair Gloss by Black Phoenix Trading Post

Haute Macabre Hair Gloss – also available as a bundle with the original Haute Macabre Fragrance

Click Here to Visit the Haute Macabre Shop

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

As Above: leather drenched with white patchouli, oak bark, bourbon vanilla, bitter almond, and Moroccan jasmine

So Below: amber and black copal with black coconut, Sumatran red patchouli, green cardamom pod, and golden musk.

Inspired by the Hermetic philosophy in which all things work in unison together, As Above and So Below may be worn separately or layered together to create a complex spell of scents. You may amplify this spell with the addition of the So Below Hair Gloss.

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

The original Haute Macabre: Oak leaf, bourbon vanilla, almond husk, and black leather accord darkened by a 13-year aged black patchouli.

Pre-Orders Close Midnight Tonight (CST) for a May fulfillment

Visit the Haute Macabre Shop to place your orders now

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

Last Chance: Haute Macabre + Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Pre-Sale Ends Tonight

by on Apr.14, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

Spring pre-orders are now open in the Haute Macabre Shop for our exclusive Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab line, including three new permanent additions: our third installment to our Cemetery Collection, Laurel Hill, and Hair Glosses in both the original Haute Macabre fragrance and our most beloved, So Below.

Pre-Orders will be open until Midnight Tonight CST for a May fulfillment

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab Laurel Hill

Brand New! Laurel Hill contains notes of mountain laurel petals limned in pale pink settling among boughs of hemlock, soft mosses, and dark lichens.

I spent a hot summer afternoon wandering through Laurel Hill’s rolling hills and green grasses, exploring its inhabitants and watching an intense thunder storm roll in over its gardens, danced with ghosts in an unlocked receiving vault, and collected animal bones that were offered to me. This is my gift back, to share with all of you.

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

The Burying Point is the oldest cemetery in Salem, MA, dating back to the year 1637, bordered by a tribute to the victims of the Salem Witch Trials. I walked through here on a beautiful morning once, and fell in love with the crumbling markers, all decorated with mememto mori markings popular in the era. Our interpretation of it contains notes of damp clusters of brown patchouli, dried maple leaves, black sage, spikenard, and curled, misshapen mandrake roots.

Just above the French Quarter in my beloved New Orleans, St. Louis #1 is one of the oldest cemeteries in the city, and the alleged final resting places of VooDoo Queen Marie Laveau and the cruel Delphine LaLaurie. Bottled here with drooping Spanish moss and crumbling marble, sweet olive blossom, 13-year aged black patchouli, and offerings of Bay Rum, Florida water, and tobacco.

Click Here to visit the Haute Macabre Shop

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

Haute Macabre and Black Phoenix Trading Post are pleased to present to you Hair Gloss, available in the original Haute Macabre fragrance and the beloved So Below.

We have combined Tahitian Moni, Camelina Oil, Argan Oil, and Karanja oil to give your mane a gleaming finishing shine, without feeling weighed down or greasy. Paraben and sulfate free, with no petro-chemicals, GMOs, and no triclosan, and 100% Cruelty Free. One to two sprays onto damp or dry hair will leave your hair glossy and silky, and wrap you in our signature scent that embodies the aesthetic of Haute Macabre: mysterious and dark.

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Trading Post Hair Gloss: So Below

So Below Hair Gloss

Haute Macabre Hair Gloss by Black Phoenix Trading Post

Haute Macabre Hair Gloss – also available as a bundle with the original Haute Macabre Fragrance

Click Here to Visit the Haute Macabre Shop

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

As Above: leather drenched with white patchouli, oak bark, bourbon vanilla, bitter almond, and Moroccan jasmine

So Below: amber and black copal with black coconut, Sumatran red patchouli, green cardamom pod, and golden musk.

Inspired by the Hermetic philosophy in which all things work in unison together, As Above and So Below may be worn separately or layered together to create a complex spell of scents. You may amplify this spell with the addition of the So Below Hair Gloss.

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

The original Haute Macabre: Oak leaf, bourbon vanilla, almond husk, and black leather accord darkened by a 13-year aged black patchouli.

Pre-Orders Close Midnight Tonight (CST) for a May fulfillment

Visit the Haute Macabre Shop to place your orders now

Haute Macabre Black Phoenix Alchemy Lab

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

So we met at the Cemetery Gates: An Interview with Nathan Graves

by on Apr.13, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The Cemetery Gates

I freely admit that I first fell in love with the Pacific Northwest from afar while watching Twin Peaks back when I was attending high school in Chicago, but I’ve actually lived in the PNW since 2000. With its deep, lush forests, stormy beaches, and seemingly endless chains of grey, rainy days, the PNW is a wonderful place to live if you’re partial to melancholy weather and green landscapes. It’s also home to two fantastic cities with lots to offer the darkly-inclined. However, until very recently, if you lived in Portland and wanted to go shopping for antique and vintage morbid treasures, taxidermy and scientific specimens, and other assorted oddities and curiosities, there was no single location offering all those things. Enter Nathan Graves and his enticing emporium of weird wonders, Cemetery Gates, Portland’s premier oddities shop. Haute Macabre recently sat down with Nathan to learn more about him and his rapidly growing business.

HM: How did you first find yourself interested in collecting and later selling the dark, unusual, and macabre in a professional capacity?

NG: I’ve been “picking” since I was 6. My family used to get BBQ every Sunday and I was allowed to pick out one small thing from the thrift store next door and even then it was always something weird. Often times it was a book once I was a bit older. Around 10 I started collecting old editions of the Guinness Book Of World Records, which started my obsession with “natural” oddities and anything magic or Houdini related, which immediately lead to mediumship and spiritism. By 13 I was the weird kid. I’ve always collected, but it wasn’t until my late 20’s that I started to focus specifically on the odd and macabre. I’ve had so many careers, from building lowriders to cooking ramen, and yet here I am, exactly where I started, acquiring and researching everything I can, wide eyed and eager for more.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: Tell us a little about how you started Cemetery Gates, your influences and inspirations, and your specific drives and goals for your business.

NG: I’m first generation American, born in south Florida and came to Portland in my late 20’s by way of D.C. When I first moved to Portland and found a favorite graveyard to sulk around in, there was a coffee shop near it that had just closed called “Cemetery Gates Cafe” that I heard was a nod toward The Smiths. I immediately thought that would be a great name for a macabre boutique and why does Portland, the self proclaimed weirdest city, not have an oddities shop? That thought wouldn’t cross my mind again for four years.

The initial intention of this brand was mostly a social media marketing experiment and a way to get rid of some of the doubles (or triples) of my books. I was inspired by an Instagram account called Moonstruck Vintage Finds, one of a few brands pioneering the “comment to buy” method of sales. At the time I sold mid century modern home decor and retro electronics on eBay and was burned out by all the fees and lack of personal touch, so this platform seemed exciting and almost infinitely dynamic. I was about a year into it when I decided to leave my previous career so that I could devote my effort completely to this endeavor. At that point the turn over of product was increasingly rapid and I was receiving praise and support from the people in the community that I was most inspired by, which emboldened me to make an attempt at closing the gaps between us. But even this was only sustainable for so long, what with the growth in following and rate of transactions, so in my second year I bought a domain and started CEMETERYGATES.CO.

Throughout all of this my intention has been to provide quality, unique items, “reasonably priced” while obviously increasing my own collection and knowledge. As I’ve grown and the brand has become bigger than me and my collection, so have my goals. I envision a community where education is free, sourcing and authenticity are transparent and integrity is a standard. For a lot of collectors, our space is sacred, it’s safe. That shouldn’t come with sacrifice or high cost and you should know where it’s coming from. That’s the ideal experience I’d like to provide whether a purchase is made or otherwise.

Not too distant future goals include: artist series packaging, apparel and home goods and an image resource blog with high res scans of all photographs, book covers and illustrations from my collection. There’s talk of a YouTube channel, but I’m really freaked out about that idea still so that’s on the back burner.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: We once talked about how the Morbid Anatomy Museum sometimes offered classes to its patrons. What sorts of hands-on educational opportunities are you interested in offering through Cemetery Gates?

NG: I’m always willing to share knowledge or connect people to others more educated on a topic. I volunteer at a non-profit called Marrow and will be offering free courses on insect pinning and framing.  The Art Institute has asked me to speak each semester on social media and marketing, so I’m always available to discuss what does or very does not work (for me anyway). As for adults in the PNW, there will be programming for taxidermy, bug pinning, terrariums and possibly DIY spooky home decor this summer.

HM: What are you up to when you aren’t at work or out collecting treasures for your shop?

NG: There’s rarely a time when I’m not actively seeking things out. Much of my life overlaps that way. I enjoy exploring remote cemeteries and abandoned areas, which is also where I prefer to shoot product. These places are always in the middle of nowhere so I just pick one on the map and stop whenever I see a shop or town that looks like I want to dig around in.

On the rare occasions that I’m not spooking around an old church or graveyard, I volunteer at a nonprofit called Marrow, that’s a radical education and creative space for teens. Most recently I’ve been assisting the founder, Daylynn in the renovations in their new space, but I will be offering workshops on anything I’m capable of educating the community on and that they might take interest in.

I apprentice under and assist a street artist and screen printer who’s moniker is RX SKULLS.  In addition to street art, they run a screen printing company from their studio. I take on a lot of the tasks before and after the actual printing itself in exchange for education and print/design work for my brand. (I would’ve done it all for free since we’re friends though, so joke’s on him.) While our work together on Cemetery Gates has been clandestine, you can expect to see the fruits of our labor by this summer.

The rest of the time I’m probably sleeping or overdoing self care.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: As a collector of oddities and other vintage morbid treasures yourself, does your personal collection have a particular theme?

NG: My collection is and always has been all over the place. I’m drawn to anything rich with provenance or a good story. Gifts and things I find “in the wild” are always permanently personal collection. One of a kind or extremely rare finds as well, even if they aren’t valuable. Some items instantly transport me to the time in my life in which I received them and those are what mean the most.

HM: As a collector myself, I too prize pieces that have interesting provenance and stories behind them. What’s one of your favorite stories attached to something you own? 

NG: Because of my propensity for provenance, it’s difficult to choose one story. For simplicity I’ll go with my most recent. I got a tip that there was a living estate being liquidated and that they had a child’s coffin. Obviously I had to have it, so I closed up shop and drove out to this Deliverance-y part of Oregon and there it was as promised. As it turns out, I was purchasing this coffin from the man to whom it was intended to be a home for in death. In the 1940s, at four years old, he and his brother were diagnosed as “fatally ill” so the family began the necessary measures of planning the funerals and had two coffins made. Well the brother died like they said he would, but the other one made a “miraculous recovery”. For reasons I can not comprehend, they gave this child his coffin and inexplicably he decided to just hold onto it until he was old enough to need a bigger one. Now I can’t sell this coffin because the story is worth more than the object that it lives in.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: How does selling oddities affect your personal collection? Have you ever parted with something you now wish you’d kept?

NG: I stopped putting price tags on anything that would break my heart if we parted ways, so yes. Sometimes I get so wrapped up in my brand and excited about what I find that I sell it “because I can” and then the collector in me regrets it. About 80% of my personal collection has a price tag on it, currently. I’m looking forward to the time in my life when I can keep more for myself and potentially start a small museum in Portland. However, if I part with something I love that ends up with someone important to me I’m usually far less moody about it.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: Seasoned pickers and collectors often seem to have interesting stories about people they’ve met in their travels. Are there any characters you’ve encountered over the years who particularly stand out?

NG: Due to the macabre nature of most my finds, the majority of the people I encounter are just happy to see whatever odd item I’m currently fawning over and then they leave, so the transactions are over before the hi, how do you do’s. Of course this is not always the case, so when I meet a fellow weird in the wild, I try to coax at least one tale out of them. I actually wanted to start a blog about those interactions and have been documenting most of my travels and acquisitions for the past year, but that’s another thing entirely.

So story that stands out the most to me took place at my favorite flea market during my brief and arduous tenure in Nashville. There is a little old lady there, I’d wager in her late 80s at least, that always had the best jewelry caskets. After a few months of routinely cleaning her out she finally asked what I did with all of them. I coyly informed her that I mostly displayed what most people would consider morbid keepsakes in them. Much to my surprise she was overjoyed. She then proceeded to tell me that in the “Victorian days” it was fashionable for women to have “a lot of hair, you know, down there.” She informed me that it was common for the “ladies of the evening to keep that area shaved and neat, for hygienic purposes. So they wore these crotch wigs down there!”, she exclaimed excitedly, but then grew frustrated that she couldn’t remember the term. I knew, by the way, but how could I possibly stop this? She began rattling off every “m” word she could come up with, “moogle, murphy, moo moo, no that’s a dress or sorts.” Finally she clapped her hands together and shouted “MERKIN” and then high-fived me. To this day that is the best high five I’ve ever received.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: Have you ever come across something that was somehow too weird for you to buy? What about something that you really wanted but, for whatever reason, you didn’t get and still think about today. What’s the one big thing that got away? 

NG: This is a legitimately painful topic for any collector. I have two of these, one was due to my own mistake, the next was out of my budget eternally.

First one is totally cut and dry, I lost an auction because I set my alarm based on a different time zone. I’m still really mad at me for that, but it gets worse. It was an antique “witch killing kit”, a very ornate metal tube with a stake, a few sticks for kindling, a bit of rope for binding and a scroll with a prayer that somehow was intended to justify murdering someone. I imagine it was most likely from the 1800s and akin to the vampire hunting kits and not something you’d pick up at the general store circa 1600s. Anyway it sold for under $100, much to my chagrin

The second item is a snapshot of Jim Jones doing his thing before he did that other thing. That combines two of my most sought after items, memorabilia from cults that ended in mass death and obscure photographs. Since the thrill of the hunt is so important to me, I couldn’t justify the price tag.

HM: Is there anything you won’t buy, either for yourself or the shop?

NG: No hate group memorabilia of any kind. Otherwise as long as it isn’t illegal, anything goes.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: With regard to your own collection, you mentioned how much you prize things found in free boxes or gifts you’ve received. What are some of your most favorite items and where did you find/how did you come to receive them?

NG: The honest answer would be a few gifts from friends, but the things I hold dearest, I don’t often share. That being said, I was recently digging through a box of mail in an abandoned wedding chapel and found a stack of nudes from the early 1900s, so I’m going with that.

HM: What’s you personal collecting holy grail? The one specific thing you desperately want above all other things.

NG: A polycephalous or “two-headed” human specimen since we’re talking about “the big one”. If I were to pick something realistic, I’d say anything related to Jonestown or Heaven’s Gate.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: You recently acquired an assortment of real human skulls for your shop. What would you like done with your own mortal remains? Do you fancy your body or parts of you ending up in someone else’s collection?

NG: I would love to say something deep like I envision my remains on display in a museum I curated as my legacy, but I’m going to answer this the same way I did when someone asked me the same question before I ever even dreamed about Cemetery Gates: when I die I want Michael McDonald to cover any Three 6 Mafia song of his choosing (but I kind of hope it’s “Tear da Club Up” or “Who Run It”) at my funeral and then everyone does a line of my ashes and high-fives each other.

The Cemetery Gates

HM: What are the best ways for people to keep up to date with Cemetery Gates?

NG: Instagram is currently where I communicate most things related to the brand. I leak info on upcoming products and occasionally run sales from the stories feature. A new website is in the works and there will most likely be a newsletter feature for those who are so inclined.

The Cemetery Gates

Find Cemetery Gates: Instagram // Facebook // Webstore, or visit The Cemetery Gates in Portland at 2504 SE 50th Ave.

Photos by Daylynn Lambi.

The Cemetery Gates

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

“The Demonologist” Author Sues Conjuring Films Because Demons Aren’t Real

by on Apr.11, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The Conjuring 2

Husband-and-wife duo Ed and Lorraine Warren founded the New England Society for Psychic Research in 1952 and went on to author numerous books about spirit activity, often speaking to packed crowds at universities and lecture halls. Many of the hauntings they claim to have witnessed are ghost story classics: the Warrens were some of the first investigators at the Amityville haunting and also visited the Perron family, whose story later became the plot for the Conjuring films by Warner Bros. And that’s where things got a little messy.

Annabelle

If you’re ghost-obsessed like we are, you’ve read Gerald Brittle’s 1980 book The Demonologist. It’s the definitive Ed and Lorraine biography — definitive in part because prior to the book’s publication, the Warrens signed a contract giving away the rights to their life story. According to the Hollywood Reporter, who obtained a copy of the most recent lawsuit, “The couple agreed to a no ‘competing work’ provision that is still in effect.” Brittle’s first lawsuit was filed 3 years ago in 2014, when he attempted to block future films in the franchise. The debacle generated a terrific amount of punny headlines involving being “haunted by lawsuits” but was ultimately dismissed because — get this — Warner Bros. claimed that the Conjuring films were based on “historical facts” and not The Demonologist. In retrospect, that may not have been the best thing to say about your spooky demon movies.

The Conjuring

Brittle’s current strategy goes something like, well, demons don’t exist and so the movies can’t possibly be based on fact. “This is a pattern of deceit that is part of a scheme that the Warrens have perpetuated for years,” reads a letter from Brittle’s lawyer quoted by io9. “There are no historical facts of a witch ever existing at the Perron farmhouse, a witch hanging herself, possession, Satanic worship or child sacrifice.” Andrea Perron, a victim of the farmhouse haunting that formed the plot of the Conjuring, has also joined the fray — on her own Facebook. “Admittedly, I have not yet read The Demonologist but I am told elements of our story are included in that book,” Perron wrote. “I think this ghostly writer is grabbing at straws. Perhaps this is some sort of misguided retirement plan. Either way, I’m staying out of it.”

Ed & Lorraine Warren

“It is very hard to believe that a large conglomerate such as Warner Brothers, with their army of lawyers and who specializes in intellectual property rights deals, would not have found The Demonologist book or the deals related to it, or Brittle for that matter,” continues Brittle’s lawyer. He may have a point here — below is a 2011 tweet from Conjuring director James Wan, discovered by the A.V. Club.

I watch/read a lot of scary stories. But fuck, THE DEMONOLOGIST, true life account of Ed & Lorraine Warren, is the scariest book I’ve read.

— James Wan (@creepypuppet) November 30, 2011

annabelle-with-ed-and-lorraine

Chase+Scout

Leave a Comment more...

Site Representation Request

If you have a relevant website and wish to be represented on GothicHoliday.com, please send a link to your site with a brief description and be sure to include a note granting permission to include your content. Send requests to netherworldnetwork[at]comcast[dot]net with the subject line "content feed permission" and we will be happy to consider adding your site to our family of associated websites.

Information Content Disclaimer

The views and opinions stated in any and all of the articles represented on this site are solely those of the contributing author or authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of GothicHoliday.com, The Netherworld Network, its parent company or any affiliated companies, or any individual, groups, or companies mentioned in articles on this site.