Star-crossed Fruits for Day 27 with Billy Kheel!

by on Oct.28, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

If you see any tear-jerking heartstring tugging fruit-oriented anthropomorphic film this year, make it this one! The bad luck of citrus love probably doesn’t hit all oranges, but one fine day in this orange grove, orange A meets orange B, and it’s a match made in heaven… but not for long! We’re not really sure what the fascination has been with Jamba Juice for Mr. Kheel… (last year’s piece, someone was drinking juice while hanging in the tanning bed) perhaps we’ll never know.

But honestly, it just isn’t Gothtober without Billy Kheel, he’s been with us since the beginning. His trademark weirdness prevails yet again for another season of the type of gruesome greatness we’ve come to expect from this skilled veteran. Working with Glen Alger Schricker, they’ve put together an emotional drama that hits every button from laughter to tears, and has changed the way you think about your fresh squeezed juice forever.

Want to know more about the artist? Here’s Billy’s site! 

Leave a Comment more...

Prickly Personality

by on Oct.28, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Shot by Sergio de Luz for Love Sex Dance Magazine.

I’m thinking the spiky updo has distinct possibilities.

Leave a Comment more...

Skull Camera

by on Oct.27, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Gothic Tea Society | Go to Original Post

gothicteasociety.com

As Halloween fast approaches, we were inspired to bring you some of the most bizarre and dark eco products. Hands down, this pin hole skull camera crafted by sculpture artist Wayne Martin Belger is the spookiest we have ever seen. The piece, entitled Third Eye, is part of a small collection of eerie photography equipment made from metal, precious stones, and human remains.

The device works by briefly exposing film inside the skull. And just like other pin hole cameras, there are no lenses, battery powered flashes, or any ability to zoom in on a subject. Belger says he prefers this low-tech photo capturing method, because it’s the most “true representation of a segment of light and time – a pure reflection of what is at that moment.”

See the full article HERE
Leave a Comment more...

Doppelgänger Monday • Day 24′s Amy Lockhart

by on Oct.26, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

You’re sitting on the couch, eating some crumbs, and then, out of nowhere, a facsimile of yourself approaches you, picks a fight with you and all heck breaks loose! Observe the meta experience of one Sharky the Cat, here for his second Gothtober experience, a feline fray not for the weak at heart. You may be superstitious and believe that a black cat crossing your path is bad luck. Don’t worry, the rule doesn’t extend to computer monitors, black cats on computer monitors are okay, which is good, because there are TWO of them.

Amy Lockhart is an amazing animator, and she’s going to be making a film about The Dizzler. If you want to make sure you’re updated, visit the Dizzler blog once in awhile to stay in the loop.

Leave a Comment more...

The Tricks and Treats of Echo Park • Day 23

by on Oct.26, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

Jenny Walsh is one of Gothtober’s extreme veterans, you can track her pieces all the way back to the very first Gothtober. One of the cool things about Gothtober is that often, not just friends, but family gets involved in various Gothtober pieces! We know a Mom who can make the best jell-o brain you’ve ever seen, we’ve witnessed people’s cousins getting chomped by zombies, and we’ve watched babies born in the month of Gothtober grow up to be full-blown candy-eatin’ kids! You will see candy eatin’ kids in this Gothtober piece, the kids of Jenny and Dave, born and raised in Echo Park. Gothtober is made in Echo Park, and while we get to give out candy over here, we didn’t grow up as full-blown trick-or-treaters in our neighborhood. Seeing trick-or-treating through the eyes of actual kiddos is pretty cool. It is true that, like the Flying Dutchman, the Ghost Lowrider of Echo Park cruises through the neighborhood blocks, its deep bass setting off car alarms and making trees shudder as it makes its way to the great beyond…

Leave a Comment more...

It’s No Glass Slipper

by on Oct.26, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Presently, this is just a Photoshopped concept image, but how far off is an implant like this? Breast augmentation is commonplace, and in more extreme modification subcultures, jewelry and whiskers implants are.  We’ve seen forked tongues and devil horns, so why does this seem like it’s went just a step too far (pardon my terrible pun)?

From Bit Rebels :

We have seen the odd and weird peirced people that literally changed their appearance into something uneartly assuming to get attention or to be original.  So why would this not be possible as well?  An incorporated stiletto heel into your foot could possibly be the new “edge”.  I am sure we’ll see someone who will go all out and actually do this.  To me, this is just as weird as it comes.  It looks painful and alien to me, but I guess the stuff people will do to stand out will always be pushed farther and farther into the land of the weird.  What do you think?  Is this something that women dream of?

Via Laughing Squid

Leave a Comment more...

There’s Mud Monster in Your Eye • Day 26

by on Oct.26, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

Accompanied by music composed by Michael Mahalchick, the world of breathing stop-motion ceramics by Professor Rattlesnake (aka Trixy Sweetvittles, aka Shelly Wattenbarger) introduces an otherworldly hallucinatory metamorphosis to your monitor.

Today marks the new moon. Breathe in, breathe out, and follow the mud, and see where it takes you. It is said that some mud monsters are over 200 years old. Some mud monsters like to dirty dance their way through the moonlight, some are accountants, others are sitting real still to form sedimentary rock, as is customary when those ecological deposits start to accumulate. Mud monsters (not to be confused with muck monsters, slurry monsters or clay/adobe monsters) are an adventurous lot and today’s Gothtober piece reinforces that  fact. This gritty (with sand, clay and water) individual’s adventure into the cave of madness will deliver you to parts unknown, enjoy your trip!

 

Leave a Comment more...

An Ancient Myth with Stephanie Abler • Gothtober Day 25

by on Oct.25, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

There’s nothing like a red-robed goddess riding on the back of a lion to brighten your day! Told in a mode reminiscent of the Cherial Scrolls used in storytelling traditions of India, Stephanie Abler returns to Gothtober with a beautifully illustrated tale from one of the world’s oldest religions. This six-minute sequence that combines 29 gouache paintings with sound and music tells an ancient story in which a goddess battles a demon in the form of a buffalo.

Watch Durga the goddess get to work with her sword, a trident, a bow and arrow, her rope, and other weapons (she has a lot of arms)! Watch her fight lions, warriors, an elephant and many other demon forms! Get some popcorn and enjoy this captivating whirlwind Hindu story of creation and destruction where the cosmos show that even gods and goddesses spiral through an unending cycle of birth, death or dissolution, and reincarnation.

And if you like Steph’s work as much as we do, check out Stephanie Abler’s blog! 

Leave a Comment more...

I, Myself, Am Strange & Unusual

by on Oct.25, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Beetlejuice :: Photographed by Matthew Shave

Via Blood Milk

 

Leave a Comment more...

Growing Up for Goths

by on Oct.24, 2011, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from Gothic Tea Society | Go to Original Post

gothicteasociety.com
Interesting article in the Guardian:

What happens when a teenage goth grows up? Gets a job, takes on a mortgage, has a couple of kids…? Can you combine elaborate Frankenstein make-up and a lace-up bustier with getting a toddler ready for nursery and yourself to work on time?
Dr Paul Hodkinson, deputy head of Surrey University’s sociology department and an expert in youth music subcultures, has been re-interviewing a group of goths he first studied in the late 1990s to find out. “They were teenagers and in their early 20s then, and I thought it would be interesting to go back because a number of people do stay involved in the goth scene,” he explains.
Though many people who belong to youth subcultures such as punk and rave tend to drift away in their 20s, Hodkinson says it’s more likely that older goths will want to remain involved in the scene, even though it may become harder to combine with the responsibilities that come with age.
To outsiders, it’s the visual markers of being a goth – long, dyed-black hair, black clothes, pale faces contrasted with dark, dramatic eye make-up –that stand out. Taken on their own, these characteristics might be reasonably easy to cast off. However, Hodkinson says that although the aesthetic and clothing are important, the primary tenets of involvement in this subculture mean being “thoroughly passionate about goth music and style, and some goths would tell you they have an interest in the dark side of life, and a natural tendency towards a degree of angst”.
This means a level of commitment to the goth scene, and friendship groups and identity that develop around being a goth, which result in social lives that “are so intertwined that it would feel very odd to leave it,” he says.
Continuing with education and getting a decent job while staying involved isn’t as hard for goths as it may be for those involved in other youth subcultures, some of which promote disengagement with school to the point that academic failure is all but inevitable.
“It’s a relatively middle-class subculture, so despite … all the going out and being into the music, goths have always had a fairly positive view of people who are also achieving academically.”
It means goths may have better career options than an outsider might expect. Succeeding in their chosen career had, Hodkinson observes, become increasingly important to those he interviewed as they moved into their late 20s and 30s, and he was surprised by how much participants in his study were willing to adapt their look to fit in at work. “I even gave people scenarios where they couldn’t wear certain things. I expected them to say that they’d have to leave [their job], but they said they’d have to seriously consider it.”
Most of his sample said they still were recognised as goths at work, but had toned down their look. “They retained a residual element of the appearance, but felt, for example, that colourful dyed hair wasn’t going to work, and they’d stopped painting their nails black.”
Several of Hodkinson’s interviewees now had children, and he says that another sign of the importance of remaining involved despite this enormous life change is the recent appearance of websites discussing the issues facing goth families.
More parents are bringing their babies to goth festivals, too, Hodkinson says, “so organisers have started to think about policies and whether to provide facilities”. For what Hodkinson calls “a fairly hedonistic youth subculture” to consider offering kids’ clubs and on-site childminding means that demand from more mature goths is definitely on the increase.
Hodkinson says these individuals have found a way of “growing up together and taking on various elements of adulthood later perhaps than others might, but doing it as a cohort of people who are passionate about the same thing, and who support each other.”

Louise Tickle · 24/10/2011 · guardian.co.uk

Leave a Comment more...

Site Representation Request

If you have a relevant website and wish to be represented on GothicHoliday.com, please send a link to your site with a brief description and be sure to include a note granting permission to include your content. Send requests to netherworldnetwork[at]comcast[dot]net with the subject line "content feed permission" and we will be happy to consider adding your site to our family of associated websites.

Information Content Disclaimer

The views and opinions stated in any and all of the articles represented on this site are solely those of the contributing author or authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of GothicHoliday.com, The Netherworld Network, its parent company or any affiliated companies, or any individual, groups, or companies mentioned in articles on this site.