Life in Death at Tower Hamlets Cemetery

by on Jul.14, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_2

What better way to escape summer heat, than to lose oneself in history for a few languid hours, sheltered by centuries-old trees and occasionally tangled in overgrown ivy. Amidst the veritable cornucopia of London’s lush green spaces are some unlikely constituents: cemeteries. The most beautiful of these are known as The Magnificent Seven, and I’ve made it my mission to explore them all.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_24

Tower Hamlets Cemetery park, like its six sisters, was established in the Victorian era to ease overcrowding in small parish graveyards. It’s home to hundreds of thousands of bodies (around 350,000, to be specific), due to the popularity of public graves at the time of its establishment – some graves are said to be forty feet deep and contain dozens of people, many of them complete strangers.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_27

Just 55 years after opening its gates, the twenty-seven-acre plot began to show signs of the neglect that would spur its descent into ruin.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_35

Still, it remained functional well into the 1960s, surviving five bombings during the Second World War and eventually becoming an official Local Nature Reserve.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_47

Though many tombstones have been destroyed or fell victim to the ravages of time, carving connoisseurs can still admire gorgeous reliefs of clasped hands, weeping angels and falling doves.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_34

And while some urns draped with stone flower garlands, Latin crosses, broken columns and other ornate, moss-grown Victorian monuments still stand, they’re slowly disappearing beneath vines, roots and blooms.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_131

Today, Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park is habitat to numerous plant and animal species, some rare and endangered – more a burgeoning woodland than a place of final rest. Visitors can unwind amidst wildflower meadows, observe wildlife, or even acquire permission to responsibly forage the grounds for natural offerings like herbs, flowers, berries and mushrooms (for personal use only and adhering to guidelines, of course).

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_73

On a summer day, the chorus of birds and countless sun dapples dancing across melting limestone make it easy to forget the somber origins of Tower Hamlets. Life has overtaken this place of death completely, in some cases quite literally. Yet the crumbling monuments remind us: the two flow side by side, and they both belong.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_126

Many more photos from my visit to Tower Hamlet Cemetery Park can be seen here.

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Life in Death at Tower Hamlets Cemetery

by on Jul.14, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_2

What better way to escape summer heat, than to lose oneself in history for a few languid hours, sheltered by centuries-old trees and occasionally tangled in overgrown ivy. Amidst the veritable cornucopia of London’s lush green spaces are some unlikely constituents: cemeteries. The most beautiful of these are known as The Magnificent Seven, and I’ve made it my mission to explore them all.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_24

Tower Hamlets Cemetery park, like its six sisters, was established in the Victorian era to ease overcrowding in small parish graveyards. It’s home to hundreds of thousands of bodies (around 350,000, to be specific), due to the popularity of public graves at the time of its establishment – some graves are said to be forty feet deep and contain dozens of people, many of them complete strangers.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_27

Just 55 years after opening its gates, the twenty-seven-acre plot began to show signs of the neglect that would spur its descent into ruin.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_35

Still, it remained functional well into the 1960s, surviving five bombings during the Second World War and eventually becoming an official Local Nature Reserve.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_47

Though many tombstones have been destroyed or fell victim to the ravages of time, carving connoisseurs can still admire gorgeous reliefs of clasped hands, weeping angels and falling doves.

TowerHamletsCemetery_ZoeticaEbb_34

And while some urns draped with stone flower garlands, Latin crosses, broken columns and other ornate, moss-grown Victorian monuments still stand, they’re slowly disappearing beneath vines, roots and blooms.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_131

Today, Tower Hamlets Cemetery Park is habitat to numerous plant and animal species, some rare and endangered – more a burgeoning woodland than a place of final rest. Visitors can unwind amidst wildflower meadows, observe wildlife, or even acquire permission to responsibly forage the grounds for natural offerings like herbs, flowers, berries and mushrooms (for personal use only and adhering to guidelines, of course).

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_73

On a summer day, the chorus of birds and countless sun dapples dancing across melting limestone make it easy to forget the somber origins of Tower Hamlets. Life has overtaken this place of death completely, in some cases quite literally. Yet the crumbling monuments remind us: the two flow side by side, and they both belong.

Cemetery_ZoeticaEbb_126

Many more photos from my visit to Tower Hamlet Cemetery Park can be seen here.

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An Old Film/Music Treat for You!

by on Jul.13, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from The Gothtober Blog | Go to Original Post

Well well well, whaddya know, it’s 2017, and the Gothtober worm turns! Time to gather some wood and start a fire for the cauldron. While we’re doing that, we’ve got something for you to watch.

From 1937, here’s a little something to share, a somewhat pastoral and stressful animated evaluation of an abandoned windmill’s structural integrity during a passing storm. Will the windmill’s delicate eco system of residents survive the weather’s blustering braggadocio? Well we honestly just don’t know!!! It’s a stressful movie, because there’s a whole situation involving a mother bird and a water wheel that is not for the faint of heart. This film, a favorite of  Hayao Miyazaki’s, is beautiful because of it’s lush colors and painterly style, along with an appreciation for creatures of the night and their engrossing nocturnal antics.

Johann Strauss II (1825 — 1899)

The Silly Symphonies cartoons were intended to accompany larger features, all of them set to compelling musical soundtracks. This film uses “One Day When We Were Young” from Johann Strauss II’s operetta The Gypsy Baron. The Gypsy Baron is quite a fun operetta featuring mistaken identity, young lovers, old lovers, comic rustics, and buried treasure! It still gets played quite a bit today. Strauss the younger is possibly the most popular composter of all time, his nickname being “The Waltz King.” If you’d like to see this piece conducted by one of the 20th century’s greatest conductors (Carlos Kleiber) lead the Vienna Phil in performing it, by all means, check this out! At 6:13 you can hear the clarinet performing one of the most difficult excerpts in the history of the instrument, a sassy A-G#-F#-G#-A-F#-B-F#!!!

But THIS Silly Symphony is different than all the others because it is the FIRST to use the multiplane camera! It was a huge game changer in the industry that opened doors to special effects as we know it. Multiplane is basically shooting downward on a “layer cake” of backgrounds and elements on transparent glass platens. Pieces are tracked and animated at different speeds and distances, giving the impression of 3-D, although not stereoscopic (to be clear). It was invented by the largely overlooked and terribly under-appreciated animation titan, Ub Iwerks, then of Disney studios. The technology was further refined throughout the late thirties, officially tested on The Old Mill (seen above) which won an Academy Award for Animated Short Film in 1937. Multiplane was then used to make Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, Pinnochio, Cinderella, Peter Pan, and many other films. Now we have digital multiplane cameras, the last animated film to use multiplane the old-fashioned way was Disney’s Little Mermaid.

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Solstice Scents Spring 2017 Collection

by on Jul.13, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Gin_Flower_EDP

I don’t know about you all, but summer is here in full force down in the swamps and I am flaming-flushed, feverish, and ready to die. I don’t even exaggerate–you can drown under the weight of your own scalding sweat here, if you don’t spontaneously combust first!  So now would seem the perfect time to do a bit of scented time travel, and immerse ourselves in the bracing breezes, restorative rainstorms, and sweetly riotous blooms of our recent Spring–Solstice Scents 2017 Spring Collection, to be precise.

(Read more about this visionary indie perfumer and their wildly imaginative aromatic enchantments in our previous feature, here.)

Gin Flower, pictured above: (Osmanthus, Elderflower, Apricot, Vanilla, Juniper, Lime, Manuka Honey Accord (Vegan), Pear, Citron, Hawaiian Sandalwood) Ok, so if you ever invite me out for a drink, and maybe I step away to powder my nose just as you happen to get the bartender’s attention–you can never go wrong with ordering a stiff gin & tonic for me. Ever since I took a sip of my grandmother’s G&T at the tender age of four and promptly burst into tears (I thought it was a tumbler of ice water!) I’ve been both obsessed and repelled by this crisp, classic cocktail. There’s something about the aromatic, pine-y gin, the bitter quinine of the tonic, and the sour, zesty astringence of that essential twist of lime that has me both “ahhhh-ing” with satisfaction while simultaneously pulling that “blech!” face. Gin Flower is based off a gin and St. Germain elderflower liqueur cocktail and is the first in a series of cocktail perfumes at Solstice Scents. It starts off with a piquant blast of juniper that is immediate and prominent and takes me back to that first quaff of my grandmother’s acrid aperitif, but shortly softens to a citrus-y, honeyed floral and sweet woods that wears very close to the skin.

After_the_Rain

After The Rain: (Lilac, Wisteria, Blue Lotus, Rain, Green Accord, Wild Violets, Earth) Is a misty watercolor painting of a fragrance, conjuring romantic visions of an elegant lady of the manor looking up from her ledgers to wistfully gaze out at her garden on a cool, rainy morning in early spring. Delicate, purple florals, restrained greenery, and the ghostly tracing of rainwater on a chilled glass windowpane. I wouldn’t quite call this an aquatic, but I hesitate to call to call it a floral. Can we pretend that there is a category of fragrance called “haunting breeze?”

blossomjamedp

Blossom Jam Tea Cakes: (Southern Tea Cakes, Petit Fours, Floral Infused Jams & Preserves and a Delicate Aroma of Tea)  I am not generally a fan of gourmands, but I do know that Solstice Scents always hits the mark with their delectable dessert-influenced fragrances… and though perhaps Blossom Jam Tea Cakes is not–initially– my cup of tea, I can recognize that it’s a lovely portrayal of these dainty tea-time delicacies. Fluffy cakes, jammy preserves, and, later, the rich sweetness of buttercream round out this fragrance. Several hours later I catch whiffs of a plastic-y vanilla from wrist, and that is fine with me; it reminds me of sniffing the heads of my Strawberry Shortcake dolls when I was a little girl, and it’s a comforting reminder that sometime a little sweetness can be a very nice thing.

chiffon_EDP

Chiffon: (Vanilla, White Amber, White Musk & Lemon Myrtle EO) At first spray this is LEMON– a bright, tart, enormous face-punch of tangy yellow juice and sour, citric acid. What’s interesting is that it dissipates almost immediately and an airy sweetness emerges, which becomes a whipped cream/marshmallow note as it lingers upon the skin. Chiffon is a “dual concept fragrance” that brings together the sweet and refreshingly tart taste of Lemon Chiffon pie and the wispy beauty of chiffon fabric.
Cameo_EDP

Cameo: (Almond, Rose, Yellow Cake, Tonka Bean, Coconut, Ginger and Red Orange) Creamy almond cake batter with rose petals, softly folded in. The oven is still heating and as the kitchen warms, the fragrances of lightly spiced ginger and milky, vanillic coconut waft from the bowl. On my skin, this confection never bakes fully through, and all the notes all remain slightly separate throughout the duration of the scent.
mountain_vanillla

Mountain Vanilla: (Sweet Clover, Coumarin, Vanilla Musk, Fresh Green Accord, Poplar Buds, Morning Dew) Described as  “…a coumarin-heavy scent with vanilla and light green elements,” Mountain Vanilla is…not the vanilla that I thought it was going to be! I guess that’s what I get for not reading the full description until just now. Coumarin, if you are wondering, is described as smelling of new-mown hay–and there is definitely a warm, sweetly herbaceous aspect to this fragrance. Don’t be put off by the opening notes, which smelled aggressively chemical to my nose for a few moments; it’s a stinging tang that burns off quickly before those grassy vanilla notes and subtle green nuances materialize. I don’t think I’ve ever smelled anything quite like it; it really does evoke imagery of an Appalachian meadow brimming with sweet clover and dew-dappled ferns and the soft musk of a Bambi or two.

Estate_Vetiver_EDP

Estate Vetiver (Estate Vanilla, Vetiver, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Lime) A perfume for vetiver and patchouli lovers, Estate Vetiver is a dank, dream of a scent that is raw, and narcotic and strange. With this one I smell only what I see in my mind’s eye, which is the damp, rotting splinters of a ship wreck, portentous dark skies and piercing sea breezes, and the lost and vengeful ghosts of two young women haunting a band of rogue pirates. As you can imagine, Estate Vetiver is my favorite among Solstice Scents Spring Collection.

Find Solstice Scents: website // instagram // facebook // twitter

 

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Solstice Scents Spring 2017 Collection

by on Jul.13, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Gin_Flower_EDP

I don’t know about you all, but summer is here in full force down in the swamps and I am flaming-flushed, feverish, and ready to die. I don’t even exaggerate–you can drown under the weight of your own scalding sweat here, if you don’t spontaneously combust first!  So now would seem the perfect time to do a bit of scented time travel, and immerse ourselves in the bracing breezes, restorative rainstorms, and sweetly riotous blooms of our recent Spring–Solstice Scents 2017 Spring Collection, to be precise.

(Read more about this visionary indie perfumer and their wildly imaginative aromatic enchantments in our previous feature, here.)

Gin Flower, pictured above: (Osmanthus, Elderflower, Apricot, Vanilla, Juniper, Lime, Manuka Honey Accord (Vegan), Pear, Citron, Hawaiian Sandalwood) Ok, so if you ever invite me out for a drink, and maybe I step away to powder my nose just as you happen to get the bartender’s attention–you can never go wrong with ordering a stiff gin & tonic for me. Ever since I took a sip of my grandmother’s G&T at the tender age of four and promptly burst into tears (I thought it was a tumbler of ice water!) I’ve been both obsessed and repelled by this crisp, classic cocktail. There’s something about the aromatic, pine-y gin, the bitter quinine of the tonic, and the sour, zesty astringence of that essential twist of lime that has me both “ahhhh-ing” with satisfaction while simultaneously pulling that “blech!” face. Gin Flower is based off a gin and St. Germain elderflower liqueur cocktail and is the first in a series of cocktail perfumes at Solstice Scents. It starts off with a piquant blast of juniper that is immediate and prominent and takes me back to that first quaff of my grandmother’s acrid aperitif, but shortly softens to a citrus-y, honeyed floral and sweet woods that wears very close to the skin.

After_the_Rain

After The Rain: (Lilac, Wisteria, Blue Lotus, Rain, Green Accord, Wild Violets, Earth) Is a misty watercolor painting of a fragrance, conjuring romantic visions of an elegant lady of the manor looking up from her ledgers to wistfully gaze out at her garden on a cool, rainy morning in early spring. Delicate, purple florals, restrained greenery, and the ghostly tracing of rainwater on a chilled glass windowpane. I wouldn’t quite call this an aquatic, but I hesitate to call to call it a floral. Can we pretend that there is a category of fragrance called “haunting breeze?”

blossomjamedp

Blossom Jam Tea Cakes: (Southern Tea Cakes, Petit Fours, Floral Infused Jams & Preserves and a Delicate Aroma of Tea)  I am not generally a fan of gourmands, but I do know that Solstice Scents always hits the mark with their delectable dessert-influenced fragrances… and though perhaps Blossom Jam Tea Cakes is not–initially– my cup of tea, I can recognize that it’s a lovely portrayal of these dainty tea-time delicacies. Fluffy cakes, jammy preserves, and, later, the rich sweetness of buttercream round out this fragrance. Several hours later I catch whiffs of a plastic-y vanilla from wrist, and that is fine with me; it reminds me of sniffing the heads of my Strawberry Shortcake dolls when I was a little girl, and it’s a comforting reminder that sometime a little sweetness can be a very nice thing.

chiffon_EDP

Chiffon: (Vanilla, White Amber, White Musk & Lemon Myrtle EO) At first spray this is LEMON– a bright, tart, enormous face-punch of tangy yellow juice and sour, citric acid. What’s interesting is that it dissipates almost immediately and an airy sweetness emerges, which becomes a whipped cream/marshmallow note as it lingers upon the skin. Chiffon is a “dual concept fragrance” that brings together the sweet and refreshingly tart taste of Lemon Chiffon pie and the wispy beauty of chiffon fabric.
Cameo_EDP

Cameo: (Almond, Rose, Yellow Cake, Tonka Bean, Coconut, Ginger and Red Orange) Creamy almond cake batter with rose petals, softly folded in. The oven is still heating and as the kitchen warms, the fragrances of lightly spiced ginger and milky, vanillic coconut waft from the bowl. On my skin, this confection never bakes fully through, and all the notes all remain slightly separate throughout the duration of the scent.
mountain_vanillla

Mountain Vanilla: (Sweet Clover, Coumarin, Vanilla Musk, Fresh Green Accord, Poplar Buds, Morning Dew) Described as  “…a coumarin-heavy scent with vanilla and light green elements,” Mountain Vanilla is…not the vanilla that I thought it was going to be! I guess that’s what I get for not reading the full description until just now. Coumarin, if you are wondering, is described as smelling of new-mown hay–and there is definitely a warm, sweetly herbaceous aspect to this fragrance. Don’t be put off by the opening notes, which smelled aggressively chemical to my nose for a few moments; it’s a stinging tang that burns off quickly before those grassy vanilla notes and subtle green nuances materialize. I don’t think I’ve ever smelled anything quite like it; it really does evoke imagery of an Appalachian meadow brimming with sweet clover and dew-dappled ferns and the soft musk of a Bambi or two.

Estate_Vetiver_EDP

Estate Vetiver (Estate Vanilla, Vetiver, Patchouli, Sandalwood, Lime) A perfume for vetiver and patchouli lovers, Estate Vetiver is a dank, dream of a scent that is raw, and narcotic and strange. With this one I smell only what I see in my mind’s eye, which is the damp, rotting splinters of a ship wreck, portentous dark skies and piercing sea breezes, and the lost and vengeful ghosts of two young women haunting a band of rogue pirates. As you can imagine, Estate Vetiver is my favorite among Solstice Scents Spring Collection.

Find Solstice Scents: website // instagram // facebook // twitter

 

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Japan’s “Corpse Hotels”: It’s There That No One Will Stare

by on Jul.12, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

The funeral for Hajime Iguchi at Sousou, a so-called corpse hotel in the Tokyo suburb of Kawasaki City, last year. Credit Ben C. Solomon/The New York Times

“Checkout time, for the living and the dead, is usually no later than 3 p.m,” writes Motoko Rich. She’s talking about the Hotel Relation in Osaka, whose accommodations include plain twin beds, flat-screen televisions, and plastic-wrapped cups and toothbrushes — oh, and, the corpses are across the hall. Hotel Relation is just one of Japan’s “itai hoteru,” or corpse hotels, and is an inn-meets-mortuary hybrid that “serve[s] a growing market of Japanese seeking an alternative to a big, traditional funeral in a country where the population is aging rapidly, community bonds are fraying and crematories are struggling to keep up with the sheer number of people dying.”

Checkout time, for the living and the dead, is usually no later than 3 p.m

It’s also a place to rest your weary head while waiting to be cremated: Japan’s 99% cremation rate, the world’s highest, means people can wait up to four days for their turn in the fire. Enter the corpse hotel, which acts as a place to store the body and the grieving family; instead of the “impersonal cold storage” of a morgue, family members can stay next to rooms fitted with altars or climate-controlled coffins with transparent lids, allowing them to look inside and say goodbye.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYZQiNn_qUc

In addition to convenience, corpse hotels offer another benefit: they’re more economical than larger funeral homes, allowing families to have a modest, intimate service. “The average funeral in Japan runs 1.95 million yen, or about $17,690. The cheapest package at the Hotel Relation costs 185,000 yen, or about $1,768,” Motoko Rich writes, citing recent figures from the Japan Consumer Association. This package includes “flowers, a room for the family to spend the night in the same room as the corpse, a traditional white gown for the deceased, a simply decorated coffin, transport of the body from the hospital and then to the crematory, and an urn to hold the ashes. Each additional night costs 10,800 yen, just under $100. Families who want separate rooms, wakes or funerals pay extra.”

Mr. Iguchi’s body on its way to a crematory. Credit Ben C. Solomon/The New York Times

Voa News reported earlier this summer that “Asia’s aging population is projected to hit 923 million by midcentury, putting the region on track to become the oldest in the world.” It will be interesting to see how Japan continues innovating death care as its citizens age and demand continues to grow faster than supply can keep up.

A cemetery outside Tokyo. Nearly all people who die in Japan are cremated. Credit Ben C. Solomon/The New York Times

A cemetery outside Tokyo. Nearly all people who die in Japan are cremated. Credit Ben C. Solomon/The New York Times

h/t Erin Blakemore at the Smithsonian

Photos all by Ben C. Solomon for The New York Times
1. The funeral for Hajime Iguchi at Sousou, a so-called corpse hotel in the Tokyo suburb of Kawasaki City, last year.
2. Mr. Iguchi’s body on its way to a crematory.
3. Relatives of Mr. Iguchi departing the crematory with his ashes.
4. A cemetery outside Tokyo. Nearly all people who die in Japan are cremated.

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Ashley Rose Couture’s “My Dearest Dust” & Other Current Conjurations

by on Jul.10, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 1

I have never met the marvelously talented Ashley Rose of Ashley Rose Couture, though I genuinely hope to do so one day. And yet, a small part of me feels like I know a small part of her. If you can tear your eyes from her ravishing, fantastical fairy tale creations and gaze beyond her opulent, avant-garde styling (though why would you want to look away from these resplendent ensembles? but bear with me for a moment), and get to the core of what she seems to be all about, there’s a big, beautiful non-conformist heart beating an exquisitely strange, but undeniably powerful song. Ashley Rose wants us to embrace our weirdness and all of the things that make us peculiar or odd or eccentric; our unorthodox attitudes and the unconventional art we proudly create that makes people stare in wonder or horror, or even–and especially–look down their noses at us. “There’s a new day coming,” she wrote in a piece last year for Vogue Magazine — and the dark, the strange, and the unusual, all have a place here.

Last August, Ashley Rose debuted her Shadows of the Realm collection at Black Veil Studio of Tattoo and Art; an enthralling display of wraiths and phantasmal creatures swathed in black lace and veils, and embellished with antlers, wings,  jawbones, and teeth, it was a shadowy spectacle three feverish months in the making. But what manner of extraordinary fantasies has this fanciful visionary and innovator been conjuring as of late? Haute Macabre recently caught up with the eternally bustling Ashley Rose, who filled us in on her upcoming show “My Dearest Dust”, as well as, offered us insights into some of her other recent projects and passions.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9Bw5WWrXhs

Haute Macabre: You are a whirling dervish! You always seem to be in the midst of finishing a collection, or starting a new one! Can you tell us a little about what you’re working on right now?

Ashley Rose: Currently I am working on my newest collection, “My Dearest Dust” which will be a continuation from “Shadows of the Realm” My previous collection was heavily inspired by the Void. In the void you are stuck in darkness with your own thoughts. Therefore, I broke up the collection into two groups- white gowns vs black gowns. I showcased the collection in a presentation format so the viewers could interact more with the models and view it as a story with emotion than what you would feel with just a model walking down a runway then leaving. In the center of the show was a massive black gown with a headpiece that was so large, the poor model had to be seated. Darkness rules the void– which is what I wanted that specific piece to represent. For my new collection, I will be following the same format as I loved how intimate the setting was. I knew that my new collection had to be a continuation of my last one. I want to continue the story with the models heading to the light or stuck in the darkness. To give the models even more of a background I wanted to give one a story. I spent this past winter reading a lot of mourning poetry one poem in particular stuck with me. “My Dearest Dust” an epitaph by Lady Catherine Dyer to her husband whom she had lost. It was absolutely heartbreaking to read. It is written by her,  a new widow hoping to be taken in her sleep, as she wishes rather to be dead than live without her husband. I spent a lot of time reading the history of the poem where a lot of people were not sure if she wrote it or commissioned it, but people believe that because of its intimacy and [the widow] never remarrying, that she did write it herself. She ended up living another thirty-three years alone after his death. Since love is what heavily inspired the poem, I wanted the gowns to be enormous white gowns. I have a lot of work to do on this new collection but I’m excited to be working on it.

Ashley Rose Dearest Dust Baby's Breath

On your facebook page and website you note that Ashley Rose Couture turns “everything obscure into wearable art”–what sorts of obscure items and discoveries did you find yourself working with lately? I also love how you collaborate with beautifully unusual models. What do you look for in the humans you wish to see draped in your creations?

When I had created the Facebook page several years ago I had been making pieces out of mirrors, shower curtains and doll parts to just name a few. I was trying to discover what my niche was as a designer, but knew these weird abstract pieces were my favorite to make. The weirder the object was the more I wanted to incorporate it onto a piece. I remember watching True Detective and later working on a stick piece inspired by the show for a shoulder piece. I always laugh thinking about what my neighbors think of me cutting branches and tying them together. Working on those pieces helped shape me into who I am now. Most recently I have been working on pieces out of bark, baby’s breath sewn into vinyl and skulls.

I have learned over the years that it is far more enjoyable to work with your friends. Some of my friends happen to be models but most of them are my friends I’ve peer pressured into modeling for me. It makes the whole experience more exciting when it’s with people you care about.

Ashley Rose Jane Converge

Your  work last year on the Converge – “Jane Live” – Album cover was gorgeous. I see you have an extensive album collection…how important is music to your work, how does it inspire and inform you? Are there any musicians you dream of collaborating with?

Working with Converge still doesn’t feel real. My boyfriend and I almost have their complete discography on vinyl so the fact that i’m now apart of that is pretty surreal. I remember showing him the record and saying “Can you believe this?” and him laughing replying “nope!” It was the most important project I’ve been apart of. That band has been with me musically through so much and I’ll always be grateful to have been included in that dream line up of artists. Music in general has always been important to me. Whether I’m working on a piece in my studio or shopping for materials I have music playing. It definitely plays into the mood of the piece I am working on. I got into hardcore and punk music in my early teens. Through going to shows I’ve met some of the most influential and inspiring people. The shows I went to while growing up (and still am) are by musicians who are also these incredible and hard working artists. It was mesmerizing to me how these artists were capable of doing so much and doing it themselves. Since music has had such a powerful impact on my life – any opportunity i get to work with a musician is incredible. From going to shows for so long (and working at a record store for 6+ years) my record collection is taking over my house a little bit. Let’s say I’m not looking forward to moving again anytime soon.

Karen Jerzyk Ashley Rose Abandoned Mansion (Untitled)

You recently, along with photographer Karen Jerzyk and a team of magic & mischief makers, took over a defunct mansion and turned it into a dark fairy tale. I get the feeling these types of shoots in derelict spaces and ruined places and are not at all foreign to you and that you in fact, relish these opportunities.. Can you tell us about the experience and perhaps about the allure of decay and the appeal of the abandoned and forgotten as it relates to your work?

I remember years ago writing to Karen Jerzyk begging to work with her. She had these haunting images and knew that was the work I was trying to do. A mutual friend introduced us years later and that was the start of our friendship. All of the locations are 100% her idea, not mine but she trusts me to design wardrobe for these amazing locations. When working on my own collections I tend to stay towards black & white. Yet working with Karen I find myself working with bold and bright colors as they can make powerful statements in these beautiful locations. She has really shaped me as a designer and she is one of the most inspiring artists I know.

Many, many thanks to Ashley Rose for catching us up on her splendid creations and extraordinary adventures over the past year, and, as a special peek for Haute Macabre readers, she has shared a generous glimpse of imagery from the forthcoming “My Dearest Dust”, below.

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 3

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 4

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 5

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 6

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 7

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 8

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 9

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 10

Photo credit: Jesse Korman
Models: Aviv, Amber & Karla
Hair: Stephanie Bartley
Set Design: Karen Jerzyk

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Ashley Rose Couture’s “My Dearest Dust” & Other Current Conjurations

by on Jul.10, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 1

I have never met the marvelously talented Ashley Rose of Ashley Rose Couture, though I genuinely hope to do so one day. And yet, a small part of me feels like I know a small part of her. If you can tear your eyes from her ravishing, fantastical fairy tale creations and gaze beyond her opulent, avant-garde styling (though why would you want to look away from these resplendent ensembles? but bear with me for a moment), and get to the core of what she seems to be all about, there’s a big, beautiful non-conformist heart beating an exquisitely strange, but undeniably powerful song. Ashley Rose wants us to embrace our weirdness and all of the things that make us peculiar or odd or eccentric; our unorthodox attitudes and the unconventional art we proudly create that makes people stare in wonder or horror, or even–and especially–look down their noses at us. “There’s a new day coming,” she wrote in a piece last year for Vogue Magazine — and the dark, the strange, and the unusual, all have a place here.

Last August, Ashley Rose debuted her Shadows of the Realm collection at Black Veil Studio of Tattoo and Art; an enthralling display of wraiths and phantasmal creatures swathed in black lace and veils, and embellished with antlers, wings,  jawbones, and teeth, it was a shadowy spectacle three feverish months in the making. But what manner of extraordinary fantasies has this fanciful visionary and innovator been conjuring as of late? Haute Macabre recently caught up with the eternally bustling Ashley Rose, who filled us in on her upcoming show “My Dearest Dust”, as well as, offered us insights into some of her other recent projects and passions.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9Bw5WWrXhs

Haute Macabre: You are a whirling dervish! You always seem to be in the midst of finishing a collection, or starting a new one! Can you tell us a little about what you’re working on right now?

Ashley Rose: Currently I am working on my newest collection, “My Dearest Dust” which will be a continuation from “Shadows of the Realm” My previous collection was heavily inspired by the Void. In the void you are stuck in darkness with your own thoughts. Therefore, I broke up the collection into two groups- white gowns vs black gowns. I showcased the collection in a presentation format so the viewers could interact more with the models and view it as a story with emotion than what you would feel with just a model walking down a runway then leaving. In the center of the show was a massive black gown with a headpiece that was so large, the poor model had to be seated. Darkness rules the void– which is what I wanted that specific piece to represent. For my new collection, I will be following the same format as I loved how intimate the setting was. I knew that my new collection had to be a continuation of my last one. I want to continue the story with the models heading to the light or stuck in the darkness. To give the models even more of a background I wanted to give one a story. I spent this past winter reading a lot of mourning poetry one poem in particular stuck with me. “My Dearest Dust” an epitaph by Lady Catherine Dyer to her husband whom she had lost. It was absolutely heartbreaking to read. It is written by her,  a new widow hoping to be taken in her sleep, as she wishes rather to be dead than live without her husband. I spent a lot of time reading the history of the poem where a lot of people were not sure if she wrote it or commissioned it, but people believe that because of its intimacy and [the widow] never remarrying, that she did write it herself. She ended up living another thirty-three years alone after his death. Since love is what heavily inspired the poem, I wanted the gowns to be enormous white gowns. I have a lot of work to do on this new collection but I’m excited to be working on it.

Ashley Rose Dearest Dust Baby's Breath

On your facebook page and website you note that Ashley Rose Couture turns “everything obscure into wearable art”–what sorts of obscure items and discoveries did you find yourself working with lately? I also love how you collaborate with beautifully unusual models. What do you look for in the humans you wish to see draped in your creations?

When I had created the Facebook page several years ago I had been making pieces out of mirrors, shower curtains and doll parts to just name a few. I was trying to discover what my niche was as a designer, but knew these weird abstract pieces were my favorite to make. The weirder the object was the more I wanted to incorporate it onto a piece. I remember watching True Detective and later working on a stick piece inspired by the show for a shoulder piece. I always laugh thinking about what my neighbors think of me cutting branches and tying them together. Working on those pieces helped shape me into who I am now. Most recently I have been working on pieces out of bark, baby’s breath sewn into vinyl and skulls.

I have learned over the years that it is far more enjoyable to work with your friends. Some of my friends happen to be models but most of them are my friends I’ve peer pressured into modeling for me. It makes the whole experience more exciting when it’s with people you care about.

Ashley Rose Jane Converge

Your  work last year on the Converge – “Jane Live” – Album cover was gorgeous. I see you have an extensive album collection…how important is music to your work, how does it inspire and inform you? Are there any musicians you dream of collaborating with?

Working with Converge still doesn’t feel real. My boyfriend and I almost have their complete discography on vinyl so the fact that i’m now apart of that is pretty surreal. I remember showing him the record and saying “Can you believe this?” and him laughing replying “nope!” It was the most important project I’ve been apart of. That band has been with me musically through so much and I’ll always be grateful to have been included in that dream line up of artists. Music in general has always been important to me. Whether I’m working on a piece in my studio or shopping for materials I have music playing. It definitely plays into the mood of the piece I am working on. I got into hardcore and punk music in my early teens. Through going to shows I’ve met some of the most influential and inspiring people. The shows I went to while growing up (and still am) are by musicians who are also these incredible and hard working artists. It was mesmerizing to me how these artists were capable of doing so much and doing it themselves. Since music has had such a powerful impact on my life – any opportunity i get to work with a musician is incredible. From going to shows for so long (and working at a record store for 6+ years) my record collection is taking over my house a little bit. Let’s say I’m not looking forward to moving again anytime soon.

Karen Jerzyk Ashley Rose Abandoned Mansion (Untitled)

You recently, along with photographer Karen Jerzyk and a team of magic & mischief makers, took over a defunct mansion and turned it into a dark fairy tale. I get the feeling these types of shoots in derelict spaces and ruined places and are not at all foreign to you and that you in fact, relish these opportunities.. Can you tell us about the experience and perhaps about the allure of decay and the appeal of the abandoned and forgotten as it relates to your work?

I remember years ago writing to Karen Jerzyk begging to work with her. She had these haunting images and knew that was the work I was trying to do. A mutual friend introduced us years later and that was the start of our friendship. All of the locations are 100% her idea, not mine but she trusts me to design wardrobe for these amazing locations. When working on my own collections I tend to stay towards black & white. Yet working with Karen I find myself working with bold and bright colors as they can make powerful statements in these beautiful locations. She has really shaped me as a designer and she is one of the most inspiring artists I know.

Many, many thanks to Ashley Rose for catching us up on her splendid creations and extraordinary adventures over the past year, and, as a special peek for Haute Macabre readers, she has shared a generous glimpse of imagery from the forthcoming “My Dearest Dust”, below.

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 3

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 4

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 5

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 6

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 7

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 8

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 9

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 10

Photo credit: Jesse Korman
Models: Aviv, Amber & Karla
Hair: Stephanie Bartley
Set Design: Karen Jerzyk

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Ashley Rose Couture’s “My Dearest Dust” & Other Current Conjurations

by on Jul.10, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 1

I have never met the marvelously talented Ashley Rose of Ashley Rose Couture, though I genuinely hope to do so one day. And yet, a small part of me feels like I know a small part of her. If you can tear your eyes from her ravishing, fantastical fairy tale creations and gaze beyond her opulent, avant-garde styling (though why would you want to look away from these resplendent ensembles? but bear with me for a moment), and get to the core of what she seems to be all about, there’s a big, beautiful non-conformist heart beating an exquisitely strange, but undeniably powerful song. Ashley Rose wants us to embrace our weirdness and all of the things that make us peculiar or odd or eccentric; our unorthodox attitudes and the unconventional art we proudly create that makes people stare in wonder or horror, or even–and especially–look down their noses at us. “There’s a new day coming,” she wrote in a piece last year for Vogue Magazine — and the dark, the strange, and the unusual, all have a place here.

Last August, Ashley Rose debuted her Shadows of the Realm collection at Black Veil Studio of Tattoo and Art; an enthralling display of wraiths and phantasmal creatures swathed in black lace and veils, and embellished with antlers, wings,  jawbones, and teeth, it was a shadowy spectacle three feverish months in the making. But what manner of extraordinary fantasies has this fanciful visionary and innovator been conjuring as of late? Haute Macabre recently caught up with the eternally bustling Ashley Rose, who filled us in on her upcoming show “My Dearest Dust”, as well as, offered us insights into some of her other recent projects and passions.

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=w9Bw5WWrXhs

Haute Macabre: You are a whirling dervish! You always seem to be in the midst of finishing a collection, or starting a new one! Can you tell us a little about what you’re working on right now?

Ashley Rose: Currently I am working on my newest collection, “My Dearest Dust” which will be a continuation from “Shadows of the Realm” My previous collection was heavily inspired by the Void. In the void you are stuck in darkness with your own thoughts. Therefore, I broke up the collection into two groups- white gowns vs black gowns. I showcased the collection in a presentation format so the viewers could interact more with the models and view it as a story with emotion than what you would feel with just a model walking down a runway then leaving. In the center of the show was a massive black gown with a headpiece that was so large, the poor model had to be seated. Darkness rules the void– which is what I wanted that specific piece to represent. For my new collection, I will be following the same format as I loved how intimate the setting was. I knew that my new collection had to be a continuation of my last one. I want to continue the story with the models heading to the light or stuck in the darkness. To give the models even more of a background I wanted to give one a story. I spent this past winter reading a lot of mourning poetry one poem in particular stuck with me. “My Dearest Dust” an epitaph by Lady Catherine Dyer to her husband whom she had lost. It was absolutely heartbreaking to read. It is written by her,  a new widow hoping to be taken in her sleep, as she wishes rather to be dead than live without her husband. I spent a lot of time reading the history of the poem where a lot of people were not sure if she wrote it or commissioned it, but people believe that because of its intimacy and [the widow] never remarrying, that she did write it herself. She ended up living another thirty-three years alone after his death. Since love is what heavily inspired the poem, I wanted the gowns to be enormous white gowns. I have a lot of work to do on this new collection but I’m excited to be working on it.

Ashley Rose Dearest Dust Baby's Breath

On your facebook page and website you note that Ashley Rose Couture turns “everything obscure into wearable art”–what sorts of obscure items and discoveries did you find yourself working with lately? I also love how you collaborate with beautifully unusual models. What do you look for in the humans you wish to see draped in your creations?

When I had created the Facebook page several years ago I had been making pieces out of mirrors, shower curtains and doll parts to just name a few. I was trying to discover what my niche was as a designer, but knew these weird abstract pieces were my favorite to make. The weirder the object was the more I wanted to incorporate it onto a piece. I remember watching True Detective and later working on a stick piece inspired by the show for a shoulder piece. I always laugh thinking about what my neighbors think of me cutting branches and tying them together. Working on those pieces helped shape me into who I am now. Most recently I have been working on pieces out of bark, baby’s breath sewn into vinyl and skulls.

I have learned over the years that it is far more enjoyable to work with your friends. Some of my friends happen to be models but most of them are my friends I’ve peer pressured into modeling for me. It makes the whole experience more exciting when it’s with people you care about.

Ashley Rose Jane Converge

Your  work last year on the Converge – “Jane Live” – Album cover was gorgeous. I see you have an extensive album collection…how important is music to your work, how does it inspire and inform you? Are there any musicians you dream of collaborating with?

Working with Converge still doesn’t feel real. My boyfriend and I almost have their complete discography on vinyl so the fact that i’m now apart of that is pretty surreal. I remember showing him the record and saying “Can you believe this?” and him laughing replying “nope!” It was the most important project I’ve been apart of. That band has been with me musically through so much and I’ll always be grateful to have been included in that dream line up of artists. Music in general has always been important to me. Whether I’m working on a piece in my studio or shopping for materials I have music playing. It definitely plays into the mood of the piece I am working on. I got into hardcore and punk music in my early teens. Through going to shows I’ve met some of the most influential and inspiring people. The shows I went to while growing up (and still am) are by musicians who are also these incredible and hard working artists. It was mesmerizing to me how these artists were capable of doing so much and doing it themselves. Since music has had such a powerful impact on my life – any opportunity i get to work with a musician is incredible. From going to shows for so long (and working at a record store for 6+ years) my record collection is taking over my house a little bit. Let’s say I’m not looking forward to moving again anytime soon.

Karen Jerzyk Ashley Rose Abandoned Mansion (Untitled)

You recently, along with photographer Karen Jerzyk and a team of magic & mischief makers, took over a defunct mansion and turned it into a dark fairy tale. I get the feeling these types of shoots in derelict spaces and ruined places and are not at all foreign to you and that you in fact, relish these opportunities.. Can you tell us about the experience and perhaps about the allure of decay and the appeal of the abandoned and forgotten as it relates to your work?

I remember years ago writing to Karen Jerzyk begging to work with her. She had these haunting images and knew that was the work I was trying to do. A mutual friend introduced us years later and that was the start of our friendship. All of the locations are 100% her idea, not mine but she trusts me to design wardrobe for these amazing locations. When working on my own collections I tend to stay towards black & white. Yet working with Karen I find myself working with bold and bright colors as they can make powerful statements in these beautiful locations. She has really shaped me as a designer and she is one of the most inspiring artists I know.

Many, many thanks to Ashley Rose for catching us up on her splendid creations and extraordinary adventures over the past year, and, as a special peek for Haute Macabre readers, she has shared a generous glimpse of imagery from the forthcoming “My Dearest Dust”, below.

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 3

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 4

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 5

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 6

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 7

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 8

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 9

Jesse Korman Ashley Rose 10

Photo credit: Jesse Korman
Models: Aviv, Amber & Karla
Hair: Stephanie Bartley
Set Design: Karen Jerzyk

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Aural Fixation: June 2017

by on Jul.06, 2017, under Syndicated from the Web

Reposted from | Go to Original Post

Chelsea Wolfe
image via Chelsea Wolfe’s Instgram
Chelsea Wolfe’s new single, 16 Psyche, is available for your pleasure here.

Sarah
Chasing an Illusion by Larkin Grimm
“Through this music I strive to be free,” Larkin said in a statement about the album. “Free from suffering, free from shame, free from inhibitions, free from language, free from hatred, free from oppression, free from gender, free from race, free from expectations.” This spirit is pervasive throughout Chasing an Illusion; the lyrics, though sorrowful and painful meditations on difficult subject matters, when set against the lush, experimental-bordering on-improvisational-sounding instrumentation,coalesce to create potent, primal lullabies. On my favorite song from the album, “Beautifully Alone“,Grimm croons and chants, “I want to be alone, beautifully alone; I want to be alone, dangerously alone; I want to be alone, peacefully alone…and dreaming a dream of my own”–and I too, long for that solitude, and the freedom from expectations found therein. It must be said though, that truly, the entirety of Chasing an Illusion conjures a vision of transportive tranquility, of light overcoming the darkness, and healing of the deepest wounds.

Terrortron Necrophiliac Among the Living Dead

Necrophiliac Among the Living Dead (Original Soundtrack) by TERRORTRON 
Billed as a “…a posthumous electronic orb that splatters the ears of the living with a flood of brain-washing sound waves”, TERRORTRON is the horror soundtrack inspired project of Anders Manga (also the creative force behind the dark occult rock band Bloody Hammers.) Necrophiliac Among the Living Dead is the imagined soundtrack to an 80’s erotic zombie movie wherein “the nation is in a panic over corpses rising from their graves in search of fresh human bodies to devour. But for Jessica, a mortician who’s been hiding a grim sexual secret, it’s an opportunity…” The structure and build up and tension of the album–from the opening credits, to the love scene, to the corpses attacking the city–really does play out like a genuine cinematic experience, and in listening to this synth-laden, retrowave, John Carpenter/Fabio Frizzi-inspired pretend soundtrack, you really find yourself wishing its companion was an actual grainy VHS movie you could travel back in time and rent from the greasy guy at the creepy video store down the road.

Maika
Cigarettes After Sex by Cigarettes After Sex
I have marvelous Ivonne Carley  to thank for turning me on to Cigarettes After Sex. If they don’t show up as one of the bands performing at the Roadhouse on an upcoming episode Twin Peaks, I can only imagine scheduling issues were to blame, because they’re perfect for it. “I’m a flash, you were blinded by the love I had…I’m a flash, the light could only get in through the cracks” This slow, dreamy, melancholy pop feels like it’s meant to be listened to in a shadowy bar, relaxing alone on a peaceful patio or in a park at sunset, or, yes, while luxuriating in the afterglow of sex. “Think I like you best when you’re just with me And no one else…” Knowing nothing about the band when I first started listening to them, it suddenly struck me how beautifully androgynous the vocals are. I love that I realized I couldn’t identify the gender of the person singing simply by listening. I’m reminded of an interview with Andy Bell from Erasure in which he mentioned that despite being openly gay, he consciously writes lyrics that may be interpreted to suit the listener. The tenderly crooned vocals of Greg Gonzalez strike my ears as bewitchingly genderfluid. “Kisses on the foreheads of the lovers wrapped in your arms…You’ve been hiding them in hollowed out pianos left in the dark” These songs are wistful and tender, heartbroken and moonstruck. They make me incredibly sad and they make me cherish the love I’ve known. “And when you go away, I still see you…The sunlight on your face in my rear view…This always happens to me this way…Recurring visions of such sweet days…” If you like bittersweet lyrics and ambient pop, then you need this album in your rotation. “And I will gladly break it, I will gladly break my heart for you…”

Trouble Snake Eyes 45

Trouble – Snake Eyes 7”
I still have Twin Peaks on the brain and I’m completely unapologetic about it. Episode 5 of the new season featured a band called Trouble performing on the stage at the Roadhouse. Featuring Riley Lynch (David Lynch’s son) on guitar, Dean Hurley (Lynch’s longtime music supervisor) on drums, and Alex Zhang Hungtai (of Dirty Beaches and Last Lizard) on tenor saxophone, Trouble blends blues, jazz, and rock in a way that reminds me of Morphine minus the seductive crooning of the late and sorely missed Mark Sandman. According to their label, Sacred Bones Records, the two songs on this 7” could be the only music produced by Trouble. “There may never be any more music from Trouble, but this 45 serves as physical evidence of the group’s continued existence in a parallel cinematic universe, grinding out late night Roadhouse gigs in the fictitious town of Twin Peaks, Washington.” That’s right, with the release of this 7”, Trouble has broken the fourth wall of Twin Peaks. Somewhere there’s a young Audrey Horne, wearing her brown sweater, plaid skirt, and saddle shoes, dancing in place to these two moody tunes.

Cool Nice Ghost at Nick Cave

Sonya
Nick Cave – literally everything
Since I saw Nick live in Portland the other week, I’ve been unable to listen to anything else. This isn’t altogether unusual; I’m a dead-horse type who often puts individual songs on repeat for days. Still, this return into Nick’s arms feels particularly potent. I first fell in love with Nick’s music after the release of And No More Shall We Part in (I think) 2001 — my stepdad had been a fan for over a decade and played me the album during a road trip to the coast. When Nick toured for the album, I went with my parents. I was fifteen or sixteen. It was the first and last time I saw Blixa play with the group.

Nick’s music continued to be incredibly important to me throughout my late teens and my early twenties. I took a bit of a break then, having turned into one of the marshmallow throwers in Oh My Lord and not finding quite what I needed in Lyre of Orpheus and, then, Grinderman. Eventually I started seeing his live shows again and it’s through these shows that I’ve come to understand his later albums, beginning to understand the powerful melancholy of Push The Sky Away and beginning to understand also the tenderness we can offer the psychopomps of our childhoods as we both grow and love and lose and change. There’s something beautifully cyclical in Nick’s music, and I feel it so much now as I watch him reel from a broken heart while singing the songs that used to comfort mine, as my entire body reverberates with the lines of “Are You The One That I’ve Been Waiting For?” and I stand next to the man I’ve been waiting for and think of all the nights weeping lonely eyes out in bathrooms of homes that aren’t mine thinking I will never ever find a person who sees me while repeating Nick’s lyrics under my breath as proof that such a person can exist: that a person can be mad and brilliant and hopeless and ugly and full of the kind of raw passion we’re always told to put away, and two such stars can find each other in the vastness of our empty black sky.

I’ve been listening to Flannery O’ Conner’s Nick, crooning about a Black Crow King. I’ve been listening to the hot lushness of Let Love In, all summer nights and let downs. I’ve been listening to the warrior poet, detailing the flowers of his town; the carnations, dear, and the daffodil; the magnolias, camellias, and azaleas so sweet. I’ve been listening to the pendulous Skeleton Tree and the part of Girl In Amber where he sings, “I get lucky, I get lucky, because I tried again” and I think about trying again during the worst time of my life, von a nach b der liebe wegen, and I feel so thankful to have been Nick’s student.

Sam
goblin-suspiria

Goblin: Suspiria soundtrack
While trying to think if I’ve listened to anything other than The Smiths or The Smiths radio on Spotify for the past few months (I get stuck in aural loops and spend entire seasons on repeat), I remembered that we’ve been listening to a whole lot of Goblin at work lately, and it’s been fantastic. The atmosphere of unease that the tinny sounds creates is akin to a supernatural visitation, a strange shadow just out of the corner of your eye. The Suspiria soundtrack especially grabs me, with the Diamonda Galas-esque (is it her? I’ve never been sure!) vocals terrorizing and seducing you.

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